Cord Stem Cell Banking Market (COVID -19 Impact Analysis) : Emerging Trends, Business Opportunities and Segmentation. Major Players are Cryo-Save AG,…

The Cord Stem Cell Banking Market report offers a complete and intelligent analysis of the competition, segmentation, dynamics, and geographical advancement of the global Cord Stem Cell Banking market. The market report is sure to lend a hand in enhancing sales and improving return on investment (ROI). This market research report provides clients with the supreme level of market data and information which is specific to their niche and their business requirements. This global Cord Stem Cell Banking market research report is a proven source to gain valuable market insights and take better decisions about the important business strategies.

Request for sample copy or PDF Here https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/request-a-sample?dbmr=global-cord-stem-cell-banking-market

Global Cord stem cell banking market is estimated to reach USD 13.8 billion by 2026 registering a healthy CAGR of 22.4%. The increasing number of parents storing their childs cord blood, acceptance of stem cell therapeutics, high applicability of stem cells are key driver to the market.

Few of the major market competitors currently working in the globalcord stem cell banking marketareCBR Systems, Inc., Cordlife, Cells4Life Group LLP, Cryo-Cell International, Inc., Cryo-Save AG, Lifecell, StemCyte India Therapeutics Pvt. Ltd, Viacord, SMART CELLS PLUS., Cryoviva India, Global Cord Blood Corporation, National Cord Blood Program, Vita 34, ReeLabs Pvt. Ltd., Regrow Biosciences Pvt. Ltd. , ACROBiosystems., Americord Registry LLC., New York Blood Center, Maze Cord Blood, GoodCell., AABB, Stem Cell Cryobank, New England Cryogenic Center, Inc. among others

Market Definition: Global Cord Stem Cell Banking Market

Cord stem cells banking is nothing but the storing of the cord blood cell contained in the umbilical cord and placenta of a newborn child. This cord blood contains the stem cells which can be used in future to treat disease such as leukemia, thalassemia, autoimmune diseases, and inherited metabolic disorders, and few others.

Segmentation: Global Cord Stem Cell Banking Market

Cord Stem Cell banking Market : By Storage Type

Cord Stem Cell banking Market : By Product Type

Cord Stem Cell banking Market : By Service Type

Cord Stem Cell banking Market : By Indication

Cord Stem Cell banking Market : By Source

Cord Stem Cell banking Market : By Geography

Browse Detailed TOC, Tables, Figures, Charts and Companies @https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/toc?dbmr=global-cord-stem-cell-banking-market&raksh

Key Developments in the Cord Stem Cell banking Market:

Cord Stem Cell banking Market : Drivers

Cord Stem Cell banking Market : Restraint

Competitive Analysis: Global Cord Stem Cell Banking Market

Global cord stem cell banking market is highly fragmented and the major players have used various strategies such as new product launches, expansions, agreements, joint ventures, partnerships, acquisitions and others to increase their footprints in this market. The report includes market shares of cord stem cell banking market for Global, Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, South America and Middle East & Africa.

Scope of the Cord Stem Cell banking Market Report :

The report shields the development activities in the Cord Stem Cell banking Market which includes the status of marketing channels available, and an analysis of the regional export and import. It helps in making informed business decisions by having complete insights of market and by making in-depth analysis of market segments. This will benefit the reports users, that evaluates their position in Cord Stem Cell banking market as well as create effective strategies in the near future.

Want Full Report? Enquire Here @https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/inquire-before-buying?dbmr=global-cord-stem-cell-banking-market

About Data Bridge Market Research:

Data Bridge Market Researchis a versatile market research and consulting firm with over 500 analysts working in different industries. We have catered more than 40% of the fortune 500 companies globally and have a network of more than 5000+ clientele around the globe. Our coverage of industries include Medical Devices, Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, Semiconductors, Machinery, Information and Communication Technology, Automobiles and Automotive, Chemical and Material, Packaging, Food and Beverages, Cosmetics, Specialty Chemicals, Fast Moving Consumer Goods, Robotics, among many others.

Data Bridge adepts in creating satisfied clients who reckon upon our services and rely on our hard work with certitude.We are content with our glorious 99.9 % client satisfying rate.

Contact Us

Data Bridge Market Research

US: +1 888 387 2818

UK: +44 208 089 1725

Hong Kong: +852 8192 7475 Mail:[emailprotected]

View original post here:

Cord Stem Cell Banking Market (COVID -19 Impact Analysis) : Emerging Trends, Business Opportunities and Segmentation. Major Players are Cryo-Save AG,...

Read more
She was on a tropical vacation when she received a text message: You need to come home to save a life – The Philadelphia Inquirer

At first, it didnt hit Stewart that her donation would help save someones life the potential recipient, unknown to her, was too abstract. But then she thought of her father, a nurse in Reading, and how, years ago, when he was 48, she was just 8. She let herself feel what it would have been like to lose him back then.

View post:

She was on a tropical vacation when she received a text message: You need to come home to save a life - The Philadelphia Inquirer

Read more
Cord blood – Wikipedia

Blood in the placenta and umbilical cord after birth

Cord blood (umbilical cord blood) is blood that remains in the placenta and in the attached umbilical cord after childbirth. Cord blood is collected because it contains stem cells, which can be used to treat hematopoietic and genetic disorders.

Cord blood is composed of all the elements found in whole blood - red blood cells, white blood cells, plasma, platelets.[1] Compared to whole blood some differences in the blood composition exist, for example, cord blood contains higher numbers of natural killer cells, lower absolute number of T-cells and a higher proportion of immature T-cells.[2] However, the interest in cord blood is mostly driven by the observation that cord blood also contains various types of stem and progenitor cells, mostly hematopoietic stem cells.[1][2][3] Some non-hematopoietic stem cell types are also present in cord blood, for example, mesenchymal stem cells, however these are present in much lower numbers that can be found in adult bone marrow.[2][3]Endothelial progenitor cells and multipotent unrestricted adult stem cells can also be found in cord blood.[3] The stem cells found in cord blood are often confused with embryonic stem cells - unlike embryonic stem cells, cord blood stem cells are all types of adult stem cells, are lineage restricted and are not pluripotent.[3][4][5]

Cord blood is used the same way that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is used to reconstitute bone marrow following radiation treatment for various blood cancers, and for various forms of anemia.[6][7] Its efficacy is similar as well.[6]

Adverse effects are similar to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, namely graft-versus-host disease if the cord blood is from a genetically different person, and the risk of severe infection while the immune system is reconstituted.[6] To assure that the smallest amount of complications occur during transplantation, levels of engraftment must be present; specifically both neutrophils and platelets must be being produced.[8] This process of neutrophil and platelet production after the transplant, however, takes much longer than that of stem cells.[8] In many cases, the engraftment time depends on the cell dose, or the amount of stem cells obtained in the sample of blood.[8] In Dr. Moises article about umbilical cord blood [9] (as cited in [8]), it was found that there is approximately 10% less stem cells in cord blood than there is in bone marrow. Therefore a sufficient amount of cord blood must be obtained in order to collect an adequate cell dose, however this amount varies from infant to infant and is irreplaceable. Given that this idea is quite new, there is still a lot of research that needs to be completed. For example, it is still unknown how long cord blood can safely be frozen without losing its beneficial effects.[8]

There is a lower incidence with cord blood compared with traditional HSCT, despite less stringent HLA match requirements.[6]

Umbilical cord blood is the blood left over in the placenta and in the umbilical cord after the birth of the baby. There are several methods for collecting cord blood. The method most commonly used in clinical practice is the "closed technique", which is similar to standard blood collection techniques. With this method, the technician cannulates the vein of the severed umbilical cord using a needle that is connected to a blood bag, and cord blood flows through the needle into the bag. On average, the closed technique enables collection of about 75 ml of cord blood.[10]

Collected cord blood is cryopreserved and then stored in a cord blood bank for future transplantation. Cord blood collection is typically depleted of red blood cells before cryopreservation to ensure high rates of stem cell recovery.[11]

The first successful cord blood transplant (CBT) was done in 1988 in a child with Fanconi anemia.[6] Early efforts to use CBT in adults led to mortality rates of about 50%, due somewhat to the procedure being done in very sick people, but perhaps also due to slow development of immune cells from the transplant.[6] By 2013, 30,000 CBT procedures had been performed and banks held about 600,000 units of cord blood.[7]

The AABB has generated accreditation standards for cord blood banking facilities.[12]

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration regulates any facility that stores cord blood; cord blood intended for use in the person from whom it came is not regulated, but cord blood for use in others is regulated as a drug and as a biologic.[13] Several states also have regulations for cord blood banks.[12]

In Europe, Canada, and Australia use of cord blood is regulated as well.[12] In the United Kingdom the NHS Cord Blood Bank was set up in 1996 to collect, process, store and supply cord blood; it is a public cord blood bank and part of the NHS.[14]

A cord blood bank may be private (i.e. the blood is stored for and the costs paid by donor families) or public (i.e. stored and made available for use by unrelated donors). While public cord blood banking is widely supported, private cord banking is controversial in both the medical and parenting community. Although umbilical cord blood is well-recognized to be useful for treating hematopoietic and genetic disorders, some controversy surrounds the collection and storage of umbilical cord blood by private banks for the baby's use. Only a small percentage of babies (estimated at between 1 in 1,000 to 1 in 200,000[15]) ever use the umbilical cord blood that is stored. The American Academy of Pediatrics 2007 Policy Statement on Cord Blood Banking stated: "Physicians should be aware of the unsubstantiated claims of private cord blood banks made to future parents that promise to insure infants or family members against serious illnesses in the future by use of the stem cells contained in cord blood." and "private storage of cord blood as 'biological insurance' is unwise" unless there is a family member with a current or potential need to undergo a stem cell transplantation.[15][16] The American Academy of Pediatrics also notes that the odds of using a person's own cord blood is 1 in 200,000 while the Institute of Medicine says that only 14 such procedures have ever been performed.[17]

Private storage of one's own cord blood is unlawful in Italy and France, and it is also discouraged in some other European countries. The American Medical Association states "Private banking should be considered in the unusual circumstance when there exists a family predisposition to a condition in which umbilical cord stem cells are therapeutically indicated. However, because of its cost, limited likelihood of use, and inaccessibility to others, private banking should not be recommended to low-risk families."[18] The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists also encourage public cord banking and discourage private cord blood banking. Nearly all cord blood transplantations come from public banks, rather than private banks,[16][19] partly because most treatable conditions can't use a person's own cord blood.[15][20] The World Marrow Donor Association and European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies states "The possibility of using ones own cord blood stem cells for regenerative medicine is currently purely hypothetical....It is therefore highly hypothetical that cord blood cells kept for autologous use will be of any value in the future" and "the legitimacy of commercial cord blood banks for autologous use should be questioned as they sell a service which has presently no real use regarding therapeutic options."[21]

The American Academy of Pediatrics supports efforts to provide information about the potential benefits and limitations of cord blood banking and transplantation so that parents can make an informed decision. In addition, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that if a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced information should be given. Cord blood education is also supported by legislators at the federal and state levels. In 2005, the National Academy of Sciences published an Institute of Medicine (IoM) report titled "Establishing a National Cord Blood Stem Cell Bank Program".[22]

In March 2004, the European Union Group on Ethics (EGE) has issued Opinion No.19[23] titled Ethical Aspects of Umbilical Cord Blood Banking. The EGE concluded that "[t]he legitimacy of commercial cord blood banks for autologous use should be questioned as they sell a service, which has presently, no real use regarding therapeutic options. Thus they promise more than they can deliver. The activities of such banks raise serious ethical criticisms."[23]

Though uses of cord blood beyond blood and immunological disorders is speculative, some research has been done in other areas.[24] Any such potential beyond blood and immunological uses is limited by the fact that cord cells are hematopoietic stem cells (which can differentiate only into blood cells), and not pluripotent stem cells (such as embryonic stem cells, which can differentiate into any type of tissue). Cord blood has been studied as a treatment for diabetes.[25] However, apart from blood disorders, the use of cord blood for other diseases is not in routine clinical use and remains a major challenge for the stem cell community.[24][25]

Along with cord blood, Wharton's jelly and the cord lining have been explored as sources for mesenchymal stem cells (MSC),[26] and as of 2015 had been studied in vitro, in animal models, and in early stage clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases,[27] as well as neurological deficits, liver diseases, immune system diseases, diabetes, lung injury, kidney injury, and leukemia.[28]

Cord blood is being used to get stem cells with which to test in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.[29]

The stem cells from umbilical cord blood are also being used in the treatment of a number of blood diseases including blood cancers.[30]

Cord blood is also being studied as a substitute for normal blood transfusions in the developing world.[30][31] More research is necessary prior to the generalized utilization of cord blood transfusion.[30]

Read the rest here:

Cord blood - Wikipedia

Read more
Umbilical Cord Stem Cells – Current Uses & Future Challenges

Umbilical cord blood contains haematopoietic (blood) stem cells. These cells are able to make the different types of cell in the blood - red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Haematopoietic stem cells, purified from bone marrow or blood, have long been used in stem cell treatments for leukaemia, blood and bone marrow disorders, cancer (when chemotherapy is used) and immune deficiencies.

Since 1989, umbilical cord blood has been used successfully to treat children with leukaemia, anaemias and other blood diseases. Researchers are now looking at ways of increasing the number of haematopoietic stem cells that can be obtained from cord blood, so that they can be used to treat adults routinely too.

Beyond these blood-related disorders, the therapeutic potential of umbilical cord blood stem cells is unclear. No therapies for non-blood-related diseases have yet been developed using HSCs from either cord blood or adult bone marrow. There have been several reports suggesting that umbilical cord blood contains other types of stem cells that are able to produce cells from other tissues, such as nerve cells. Some other reports claim that umbilical cord blood contains embryonic stem cell-like cells. However, these findings are highly controversial among scientists and are not widely accepted.

Read the original here:

Umbilical Cord Stem Cells - Current Uses & Future Challenges

Read more
Stem Cells in the Umbilical Cord – PubMed Central (PMC)

Stem Cell Rev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2013 Aug 26.

Published in final edited form as:

PMCID: PMC3753204

NIHMSID: NIHMS357342

The Midwest Institute for Comparative Stem Cell Biology and the Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS 66506-5602

Stem cells are the next frontier in medicine. Stem cells are thought to have great therapeutic and biotechnological potential. This will not only to replace damaged or dysfunctional cells, but also rescue them and/or deliver therapeutic proteins after they have been engineered to do so. Currently, ethical and scientific issues surround both embryonic and fetal stem cells and hinder their widespread implementation. In contrast, stem cells recovered postnatally from the umbilical cord, including the umbilical cord blood cells, amnion/placenta, umbilical cord vein, or umbilical cord matrix cells, are a readily available and inexpensive source of cells that are capable of forming many different cell types (i.e., they are multipotent). This review will focus on the umbilical cord-derived stem cells and compare those cells with adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

Index Entries: Umbilical cord matrix cells, Whartons Jelly, mesenchymal stem cells, umbilical cord blood cells

Stem cells are defined simply as cells meeting three basic criteria (illustrated in . First, stem cells renew themselves throughout life, i.e., the cells divide to produce identical daughter cells and thereby maintain the stem cell population. Second, stem cells have the capacity to undergo differentiation to become specialized progeny cells (1). When stem cells differentiate, they may divide asymmetrically to yield an identical cell and a daughter cell that acquires properties of a particular cell type, for example, specific morphology, phenotype, and physiological properties that categorize it as a cell belonging to a particular tissue (2). Stem cells that may differentiate into tissues derived from all three germ layers, for example, ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm, are called pluripotent. The best example of pluripotent stem cells are the embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from the inner cell mass of early embryos. In contrast with ESCs, most stem cells that have been well characterized are multipotent, i.e., they may differentiate into derivatives of two of the three germ layers. The third property of stem cells is that they may renew the tissues that they populate. All tissue compartments contain cells that satisfy the definition of stem cells (3), and the rate at which stem cells contribute to replacement cells varies throughout the body. For example, blood-forming stem cells, gut epithelium stem cells, and skin-forming stem cells must be constantly replaced for normal health. In contrast, the stem cells in the nervous system that replace neurons are relatively quiescent and do not participate in tissue renewal or replace neurons lost to injury or disease.

Generalized stem cell lineage concept. The lineage is characterized by a self-maintaining parent true stem cell population that resides within a specialized niche microenvironment, which aids the regulation of stem cell division or quiescence (nondividing). Derivative cells (called progeny or daughter cells) are of two types: symmetric division produces two identical daughter cells to expand or maintain the stem cell population; asymmetric division produces an identical daughter and a specialized cell (a differentiated cell). The differentiated cell is an intermediate type of precursor cell, termed the transient dividing population. The number of divisions of the intermediate precursor is fairly tightly regulated by microenvironment and inborn regulation factors. The intermediate precursors are thought to have a limited proliferative capacity. Further tissue-specific specialization continues form the intermediate precursors, producing specialized populations with a commitment to a progressively more specialized (differentiated) fate. The end points are fully differentiated cells that are nondividing and that live for various, tissue-specific periods prior to senescence or damage that leads to cell death. In some tissues, the naturally occurring cell loss produces various feedback signals that trigger normal cell replacement via amplification/differentiation of either stem cells or the intermediate precursors.

In the body, stem cells live in specialized niches, microenvironments included stem cell support cells and extracellular matrix. The niche microenvironment regulates the growth and differentiation of stem cells (46). Understanding the role of the various support cells and the environment of the niche is helpful for in vitro manipulation and maintenance of stem cell populations. For example, a normal atmospheric oxygen concentration of 21% is relatively toxic to stem cells, and growth in hyoxic conditions of 23% oxygen is preferred (7). Other components of the niche, such as the extracellular matrix and growth and angiogenic factors, play a role in stem cell regulation. Understanding the stem cell microenviornment is rapidly unfolding and is an important topic which, however, is beyond the scope of this article.

Stem cells have been isolated from virtually all of lifes stages. That is, stem cells have been isolated from the inner cell mass of 5-d-old embryos as well as collected from the olfactory epithelium of senior citizens. Human embryo-derived stem cells and stem cells derived from human fetal tissues have raised moral/ethical concerns that have yet to be adequately discussed and addressed by our society. These society level concerns impact the research effort directly by way of the federally mandated support limitations, blue ribbon panel inquiries, ethical debates, lawsuits, and political posturing. The bottom line is that the United States lacks clear, consistent research goals and unified leadership regarding embryonic stem cell research; this is reflected in the state-to-state differences in legislation and support for embryonic stem cell research. These issues are huge and require serious work. They are beyond the scope of this review.

Importantly, ESCs are the de facto pluripotent cells for biomedical research. Proponents state that ESCs will enable cell-based therapeutics and biopharmaceutical testing/manufacturing. In contrast, biomedical research conducted using postnatally collected tissues and stem cells has generated less controversy and enjoyed more therapeutic applications to date. This is likely owing to the fact that blood and bone marrow stem cells were found to rescue patients with bone marrow deficiencies about 40 yr ago (8,9). The result of this work produced the national bone marrow registry, which was established in the United States in 1986.

Use of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells brought to the forefront, the limitations that these types of cells are thought to have. Specifically, scientific dogma states that adult-type stem cells have limited capacity to expand in vitro. Initial work indicated that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs) become senescent (cease to divide in vitro) by passage 610. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived stem cells are reported to be more difficult to extract from the marrow cavity in normal aging because the red marrow space changes to a yellow marrow (fat-filled) as a consequence of aging. Optimal stem cell aspirates from the marrow are found in young donors (e.g., 1819 yr of age; 9a). One would think that the fat-derived MSCs would be a useful alternative to the marrow-derived MSCs for autologous grafting in aged individuals. We do not know whether this will be the case. It is known that fat-derived MSCs are more rare than bmMSCs. Therefore, extraction and expansion may be required prior to therapeutic use. It is generally thought that stem cells derived from younger tissues, for example, tissues derived from the early embryo or fetus, would have longer telomeres and have the capacity for extended expansion in culture prior to becoming senescent. There are some data to support this contention (10).

In the last 10 yr, umbilical cord blood has been shown to be therapeutically useful for rescuing patients with bone marrow-related deficits and inborn errors of metabolism. Umbilical cord blood offers advantages over bone marrow because cord blood does not require perfect human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tissue matching, has less incidence of graft vs host disease, and may be used allogenically (11,12). In addition, cord blood may be banked, and thus is available for use off-the-shelf. Last year, a federally supported program was established to expand the national umbilical cord blood banks to include a wide sample of HLA types. By 2004, there were more than 6000 cord blood stem cell units banked. As of January 2006, it is estimated that there are about 300,000 units in public and private banks in the United States.

Next to hematopoeitic stem cells, the most widely studied stem cells in bone marrow are marrow-derived MSCs, also known as marrow stromal cells. In the adult, MSCs are found in highest concentration in the marrow cavity. MSCs are found at lower density in blood and in peripheral, adipose, and other tissues. MSC-like cells can be isolated from umbilical cord blood, placenta, perivascular areas, amniotic fluid, and from the tissue surrounding the umbilical cord vessels, i.e., Whartons jelly. The collection of MSC-like cells from tissues that are discarded at birth is easier and less expensive than collecting MSCs from a bone marrow aspirate. During the collection of these tissues, there is no health impact on either the mother or the newborn. At least in theory, these cells may be stored frozen and then thawed to provide stem cells for therapeutic use decades after cryogenic storage.

As shown in , at least five different laboratories have extracted MSC-like cells from umbilical cord tissues. Some differences in the ease with which MSC-like cells are isolated from the various tissues are reported. Importantly, the methods for isolating MSC-like cells are robust, i.e., labs throughout the world independently isolate MSC-like cells from these tissues. This opens the door for independent verification, scalable production, and a large-team approach.

Cell Surface Markers of MSC-Like Cells

In contrast, although there are several reports of pluripotent cells being isolated from adults (1317), this work is in need of independent verification. Such verification is important because an alternative source of pluripotent cells, cells derived from adults, offers the best of both worlds: pluripotent cells for therapeutics and cells that are collected with consent from adults (no controversy there). Two such cell types are discussed briefly later.

The work from Dr. Verfaillies lab on the multipotent adult progenitor cell (MAPC) has received much attention (15,16,1822). Their findings indicate that the MAPC is pluripotential and slightly enigmatic, as it appears after extensive passage in cell culture. Similarly, in umbilical cord blood, Kogler et al. (17,23) identified a cell that they call the universal somatic stem cell (USSC). The USSC is another rare cell (average of 16 cells in initial isolate; able to isolate USSC in 50% of the cords attempted). The USSC, like the MAPC, offers much promise as an embryo-safe pluripotent cell. Widespread acceptance of these two cells will come when the methods for their isolation become robust such that any laboratory can isolate them and contribute to the field.

Recently the minimal defining characteristics of MSCs was the subject of a blue ribbon panel of scientists (24). This panel ascribed three defining characteristics to MSCs. First, MSCs are plastic-adherent when maintained in standard culture conditions. Second, MSCs express the cell surface markers CD105, CD73, and CD90 and lack expression of CD45, CD34, CD14 or CD11b, CD79 or CD19, and HLA-DR. Third, MSCs differentiate to osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondroblasts in vitro. As shown in , mesenchymal-like cells collected from the umbilical cord, placenta, and from umbilical cord blood, perivascular space, and placenta all share a relatively consistent set of surface markers, which is apparently consistent with the hypothesis that they are MSC-like.

Our work has focused on human umbilical cord matrix (UCM) cells. There are cells isolated in large numbers from the Whartons jelly of human cords (2528). Two other research labs have published on the isolation and characterization of cells from the Whartons jelly: Dr. Davies lab at the University of Toronto (29) and Dr. Y. S. Fu at the National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (3032). All three groups reported that UCM cells are MSC-like cells and are robust. These cells can be isolated easily, frozen/thawed, clonally expanded, engineered to express exogenous proteins, and extensively expanded in culture. Human UCM cells express a marker of neural precursors, nestin, without exposure to differentiation signals (26,28,30). In response to differentiation signals, human UCM cells can differentiate to catecholaminergic neurons, expressing tyrosine hydroxylase TH (28,30,31). Human UCM cells meet the basic criteria established for MSCs described previously (29,32). Similarly, MSC-like cells are derived from other umbilical cord tissues, e.g., umbilical vein sub-endothelium, umbilical cord blood, amnion, placenta, and amniotic fluid ().

Whether UCM cells are MSC-like or fit into a unique niche is currently not clear. For example, when the vital stain Hoechst 33342 was used in the dye exclusion test, about 20% of UCM cells were found to exclude dye (28). About 85% of the UCM cells expressed CD 44, the hyaluronate receptor marker found on several stem cell populations, and about 85% of the cells expressed ABCG2, the receptor thought to mediate dye exclusion. Attempts to enrich the Hoechst-dim cells were partially successful, with maximal enrichment at about 32%. It is assumed that culture conditions are the limiting factor for further enrichment of what is assumed to be the most primitive populations.

A literature review revealed a question about the stability of umbilical cord cells in culture. Two groups found that the cell surface marker expression shifted over passage (28,29). Sarugasers (29) work indicated that HLA-1 was lost as a result of cryopreservation. Whereas, umbilical cord perivascular cells lost cell surface staining for HLA-1 with freezethaw, HLA-1 surface staining was consistent out to passage 5 for cells maintained in culture. In contrast, Weiss et al. (28) reported a decrease in the percentage of cells expressing CD49e and CD105 when human UCM cells were maintained in culture for passage 48 and no significant changes in HLA-1 expression. This question about the stability of surface marker expression may indicate that epigenetic phenomena associated with cell culture are influencing the cord MSC-like cells. Further characterization of the cord MSC-like cells is needed to understand the mechanisms of these changes.

The gene expression analysis and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of MSCs from the umbilical cord was reported by one lab using the National Institutes on Aging (NIA) human 15k gene array (28). That work indicated that human UCM cells express genes found in cells derived from all three germ layers to some extent. At least one report indicates that UCM cells express the pluripotency gene markers Oct-4, nanog, and Sox-2 at low levels relative to ESCs (33). One interpretation of these findings is that cord matrix stem cells are pleiotropic and express a relatively large number of genes in relatively low abundance. On the other hand, it may serve as evidence that the cord matrix cell population has a subset of primitive stem cells. Because gene array is not a sensitive method by which to examine low copy number message, we suggest that massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) is a more appropriate method of assessing matrix cell gene expression. RT-PCR alone is not useful for characterizing cord matrix stem cells: quantitative RT-PCR is needed to make meaningful statements about gene expression and to compare gene expression between experimental conditions.

Several groups have isolated MSC-like cells from the umbilical cord tissues or blood and have reported that those cells may express neural markers when differentiated (26,32), and differentiate into neural cells upon transplantation into rat brain. This is not too surprising, because adult bone marrow-derived MSCs injected into fetal rat brain engrafted, differentiated along neural-like lineages, and survived into the postnatal period (34). Similarly, Jiang et al. (19) demonstrated convincingly that bone marrow-derived MAPCs could be differentiated in vitro to become cells with electrophysiological properties of neurons. Increasingly, reports are indicating that bone marrow-derived cells may differentiate, first to neurospheres and then to neurons with proper neuronal electrophysiological characteristics (35,36).

In 2003, we reported that UCM cells can be induced in vitro to become cells with morphological and biochemical characteristics of neurons (26). These findings have been extended by others, for example, neurons (3032), cardiac muscle, bone, and cartilage (29,32). Using two in vitro differentiation methods, Wang et al. (32) found that umbilical cord matrix stem (UCMS) cells could be induced to exhibit cardiomyocyte morphology and synthesize cardiac muscle proteins such as N-cadherin and cardiac troponin I. The cells responded to five azacytidine or culture in cardiomyocyte-conditioned media. Fu et al. (30) used media conditioned by primary rat brain neurons to induce human UCMS cells to synthesize NeuN neurofilament. Furthermore, they could invoke an inward current in UCM cells with glutamate. In that report, exposure to neural-conditioned media also increased the proportion of cells synthesizing the astroglial protein glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) from 94% initially to 5% after 9 d, although the percentage had declined to about 2% by day 12. The multilineage potential of UCMS cells was also verified by Wang and colleagues (32), who showed that they could be induced in vitro into chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic lineages.

MSC-like cells derived from Whartons jelly adjacent to umbilical vessels (termed human umbilical cord perivascular cells) cultured in nonosteogenic media nevertheless contained a subpopulation that demonstrated a functional osteogenic phenotype with the elaboration of bone nodules (29); addition of osteogenic supplements further enhanced this population. These findings suggest that cord matrix stem cells, like bmMSCs, are multipotent: capable of making ectoderm- and mesoderm-derived cells.

We have shown that porcine UCM stem cells can be xeno-transplanted into nonimmune-suppressed rats, where they engrafted, proliferated in a controlled fashion, and exhibited TH expression in some cells (27). Most recently, our lab (28), and others (31) have reported that UCM cells ameliorate behavioral deficits in the hemi-parkinsonian rat, and UCM cell transplantation resulted in significantly more dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra compared with lesioned, nontransplanted rats that responded to the transplant (28). In contrast with our work, in which UCM cells were transplanted without prior differentiation, Fu et al. (31) subjected UCM cells to an in vitro induction protocol utilizing neuronconditioned media, sonic hedgehog, and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-8 to increase the number of tyrosine hydroxylasepositive cells. After transplantation of these predifferentiated human UCMS cells into hemi-parkinsonian rats, Dr. Fus lab reported that they prevented the progressive degeneration/ deterioration in their Parkinsons disease model.

From these findings, it is suggested that UCM cells offer advantages over stem cells as a source of therapeutic cells. First, UCM cells are derived from a noncontroversial, inexhaustible source, and can be harvested noninvasively at low cost. Second, unlike human ESCs, UCM cells did not induce teratomas or death after 1 106 to 6 106 human UCM cells were transplanted either intravenously or subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficient beige mice (Rachakatla, Medicetty, Burton, Troyer, and Weiss, unpublished observations). Third, UCM cells are easy to start and do not require feeder layers or medium containing high serum concentrations to be maintained. Fourth, they are not acutely rejected when transplanted as xenografts in nonimmune-suppressed rats. For example, we demonstrated that pig UCM cells undergo a moderated expansion following transplantation into rat brain without obvious untoward behavioral effects or host immune response (25).

MSCs are reported to have immune-suppressive effects. To comment human fetal and adult MSCs are not inherently immunostimulatory in vitro and fail to induce proliferation of allogeneic lymphocytes (3739; for review, see ref. 40). In one human case, fully mismatched allogeneic fetal liver-derived MSCs were transplanted into an immunocompetent fetus with osteogenesis imperfecta in the third trimester of gestation (41). No immunoreactivity was observed when patient lymphocytes were re-exposed to the graft in vitro, indicating that MSCs can be tolerated when transplanted across MHC barriers in humans. Similarly, after intrauterine transplantation of human MSCs into sheep, the cells persisted long-term and differentiated along multiple mesenchymal lineages (42). Instead, the cells are immunosuppressive and reduce lymphocyte proliferation and the formation of cytotoxic T-cells and natural killer cells when present in mixed lymphocyte cultures. The mechanism whereby MSCs suppress lymphocyte proliferation is still largely unknown but appears to, at least in part, be mediated by a soluble factor. Several factors, including MSC-produced prostaglandin E2, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated tryptophan depletion, transforming growth factor-1, and hepatocyte growth factor have been proposed to mediate the suppression, but the data remain controversial.

There is indirect support for an immune-suppressive effect of the MSC-like cells derived from umbilical cord: two labs have transplanted UCM cells xenogenically in nonimmune-suppressed hosts without observation of frank immune rejection (25,27,28,31). In preliminary work, we have found that human UCM cells suppress the proliferation of rat splenocytes exposed to the mitogen ConA, and that a diffusible factor is likely involved (Anderson, Medicetty, and Weiss, unpublished observations). These data would support the hypothesis that UCM cells, like MSCs, may have immunosuppressive effects. We speculate that these effects may facilitate the engraftment of other therapeutic cells, that has been reported recently for co-grafts of MSC with hematopoietic cells (43).

In addition to their immune-suppressive properties, MSCs appear to exhibit a tropism for damaged or rapidly growing tissues. For example, following injection into the brain, MSCs migrate along known pathways when injected into the corpus striatum (44). MSCs migrated throughout forebrain and cerebellum, integrated into central nervous system cytoarchitecture, and expressed markers typical of mature astrocytes and neurons after injection into the lateral ventricle of neonatal mice (45). MSCs injected into injured spinal cord were found to form guiding cord, ushering in regenerating fibers (46). MSCs may assist with regeneration in stroke (4751) or myocardial ischemia (5255) by release of trophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, or angiogenic factors (5661).

The tissue infiltration response of MSCs is seen in experimental stroke (62) and myocardial ischemia (63), in addition to the infiltration in injured nervous system tissue listed previously.

There is now compelling evidence that MSCs, guided by chemokines and other cues emanating from areas of pathology such as tumors, will home specifically to those areas. The supporting connective tissue stroma of a tumor is formed in a manner similar to wound healing and scar formation (64), and tumors generate signals to recruit stromal cells from contiguous regions as well as from bone marrow to sustain themselves (65,66). Because UCM stem cells are very closely related to MSCs (28), it would not be surprising to find that they also will home to tumors, and in fact such a phenomenon has been observed in preliminary experiments in our laboratory (unpublished observations). The exact signals that recruit transplanted or endogenous cells to regions of inflammation or neoplasia remain obscure. However, stromal cell-derived factor-1 plays a crucial role in recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells to the heart after myocardial infarction (67). Matrigel invasion assays have implicated such molecules as platelet-derived growth factor-BB, epidermal growth factor, and stromal cell-derived factor-1 as chemokines for MSCs; however, neither basic FGF (bFGF) nor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) had an affect (68). In any event, the directed trafficking of umbilical and other mesenchymal stem cells to tumors opens the enticing prospect that they may be a platform for targeted delivery of high local levels of protein. Often, such proteins have a short half-life and/or cause major side effects when given systematically.

Mesenchymal cells have been reported to act as supporting cells that promote the expansion of other stem cell types. For example, MSCs and MSC-like cells support ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (28,6971). When co-grafted, MSCs and MSC-like cells support in vivo engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells, too (23,43,72). This work suggests that MSCs from a variety of sources, including umbilical cord, may facilitate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells. This addresses two significant problems found in umbilical cord blood transplantation: (1) getting enough cells to engraft an adult and (2) increasing the speed of engraftment (12,73). Theoretically, cografting or ex vivo expansion may enable transplantation of cord blood units into larger patients and speed the engraftment in other patients.

In addition to hematopoietic cells, Mesenchymal cells derived from Whartons jelly are useful as feeder layers for the propagation of other stem cell types. For example, equine embryonic stem cell-like cells derived from the inner cell mass were propagated successfully for more than 350 divisions on a feeder layer derived from stem cells isolated from Whartons jelly of equine umbilical cords (74). The equine ES-like cells could be maintained without leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) as long as they were on the cord matrix cells.

A major potential application of stem cells in medicine is for tissue engineering, in which the ultimate goal is to provide off-the-shelf tissues and organs. UCM cells demonstrate excellent cell growth properties on bioabsorbable polymer constructs (75). UCM cells were used to seed blood vessel conduits fashioned from rapidly bioabsorbable polymers and grown in vitro in a pulse duplicator bioreactor (76). Recently, living patches engineered from UCMS cells and cord-derived endothelial precursor cells have been described for potential use in human pediatric cardiovascular tissue engineering (77,78).

MSCs and MSC-like cells are useful multipotent stem cells that are found in many tissues. While MSCs can be isolated from adults via peripheral blood, adipose tissue, or bone marrow apiration, MSCs derived from the discarded umbilical cord offer a low-cost, pain-free collection method of MSCs that may be cryogenically stored (banked) along with the umbilical cord blood sample. From the umbilical cord, isolation of cells from the Whartons jelly has the greatest potential for banking, presently, because the most cells can be isolated consistently. The challenge for the future is to define industrial-grade procedures for isolation and cryopreservation of umbilical cord-derived MSCs and to generate Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved standard operating procedures (SOPs) to enable translation of laboratory protocols into clinical trials. This represents a paradigm shift from what has been done with umbilical cord blood banking because the cord blood cells do not require much in the way of processing for cryopreservation or for transplantation (relatively). For such a challenge to be met, researchers in the field of umbilical cord-derived MSC need to organize and reach consensus on the characterization, freezing/thawing, and expansion of clinical-grade cells for therapies and tissue engineering. Thus, more and more umbilical cord stem cells can be diverted from the biohazardous waste bag and into the clinic, where their lifesaving potential can be realized.

Dr. C. L. Cetrulo is thanked for critically reviewing the manuscript. Thanks to Dr. M. S. Rao and the members of the stem cell laboratory at NIA for their hospitality during my sabbatical leave and their continued assistance with this work. Thanks to my wife, Betti, and my children, Rita, Jonathan, Ellen, and James, for their patience and understanding. Dr. S. Bennet is thanked for assisting with umbilical cord collection. The anonymous donors are thanked for donating their umbilical cords. The Midwest Institute for Comparative Stem Cell Biology members who contributed to this work: M. Pyle, J. Hix, R. Rakasheklar, D. Davis, R. Carlin, D. Davis, S. Medicety, K. Seshareddy, C. Anderson, and M. Burton are thanked for their assistance. Thanks to our collaborators at ViaCell, Inc. (E. Abraham and A. Krivtsov, M. Kraus, S. Wnendt, and J. Visser) and at Athersys, Inc. (R. Deans and A. Ting) for their assistance and support. Drs. H. Klingemann (Tufts) and F. Marini (MD Anderson) are thanked for sharing the results of their ongoing work. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH) (salary support during sabbatical leave), Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine Deans office, Terry C. Johnson center for Basic Cancer Research and NIH NS034160. MLW is a paid consultant for RMI (Las Vegas, NV).

Read this article:

Stem Cells in the Umbilical Cord - PubMed Central (PMC)

Read more
Stem Cells Explained | What are Stem Cells?

Your body has many different types of cells (more than 200 to be more exact) each geared toward specific functions. You have skin cells and blood cells, and you have bone cells and brain cells. All your organs comprise specific cells, too, from kidney cells to heart cells.

Your cells didnt start out knowing how to come together to form your bones, heart or blood; they begun with more of a blank slate. These completely undifferentiated cells can be found during gestation, or the time the baby is in the womb, and are called embryonic stem cells. These early stage stem cells are master cells that have the potential to become any type of cell in the body.

First isolated in 1998, there is a lot of controversy around acquiring embryonic stem cells. Thankfully, we can also acquire stem cells that form just a little bit later down the road, like in the umbillical cord. These stem cells, known as adult stem cells, stay with us for life. (Later, we will learn why not all adult stem cells are equal.) Adult stem cells are more limited in the types of cells they can become, something known as being tissue-specific, but share many of the same qualities. Hematopoietic stem cells (Greek to make blood and pronounced he-mah-toe-po-ee-tic) found in the umbilical cord's blood, for instance, can become any of the different types of blood cells found in the body and are the foundation of our immune systems. Another example is mesenchymal (meh-sen-ki-mal) stem cells, which can be found in the umbilical cord tissue and can become a host of cells including those found in your nervous system, sensory organs, circulatory tissues, skin, bone, cartilage, and more.

To recap, we have certain types of stem cells that can become a variety of different cellsthey are like the renaissance men of cellsbut there is one more thing that makes stem cells special. This has to do with how they replicate themselves.

The body has two ways to create more cells. The first is usually taught in middle school science. Known as cell division, its where a cell replicates within its membrane before dividing into two identical cells. Cells do this as needed for regeneration, which we will touch on in a second.

The other way the body creates more cells is through its stem cells, and stem cells do things a little differently. They undergo what is called asymmetric division, forming not one but two daughter cells: one cell often an exact replica of itself, a new stem cell with a relatively clean slate, and another stem cell that is ready to turn into a specific type of cell. This trait is known as self-renewal and allows stem cells to proliferate, or reproduce rapidly.

Through these two means, we are always producing more cells. In fact, much of your body is in a state of constant renewal because many cells can live for only certain period of time. The lifespan for a cell in the stomach lining is about two days. Red blood cells, about four months. Nerve and brain cells are supposed to live forever. This is why these cells rarely regenerate and take a long time if they do.

Different cells have different life cycles, and many are constantly regenerating, but when damage occurs and the body needs to come up with a new supply of cells to heal itself, it relies on the stem cells ability to quickly create more cells to repair the wound. Herein lays the potential for the introduction of new stem cells to enhance or be the driving factor in the healing process.

Scientists first found ways to use stem cells in bone marrow, and following this discovery, the first stem cell transplant was performed in 1956 via bone marrow between identical twins. It resulted in the complete remission of the one twins leukemia.

This and all other stem cell therapies since involve introducing new stem cells into the area to encourage the healing process. Often, the stem cell will create a particular type of cell simply because it is in proximity to other cells of that type. Unfortunately, researchers still had a ways to go before they could use stem cells from unrelated persons.

Continue reading here:

Stem Cells Explained | What are Stem Cells?

Read more
Stem Cells Market Expected to Boost the Global Industry Growth in the Near Future – Germany English News

Advance Market Analyticsreleased the research report ofGlobal Stem CellsMarket, offers a detailed overview of the factors influencing the global business scope.Global Stem Cells Market research report shows the latest market insights with upcoming trends and breakdown of the products and services.The report provides key statistics on the market status, size, share, growth factors of the Global Stem Cells.This Report covers the emerging players data, including: competitive situation, sales, revenue and global market.

Free Sample Report + All Related Graphs & Charts @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/sample-report/72815-global-stem-cells-market-1

The stem cell is used for treating chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disorders, cancer, diabetes, and others. Growing research and development in stem cell isolation techniques propelling market growth. For instance, a surgeon from Turkey developed a method for obtaining stem cells from the human body without enzymes which are generally used for the isolation of stem cells. Further, growing healthcare infrastructure in the developing economies and government spending on the life science research and development expected to drive the demand for stem cell market over the forecasted period.

The Global Stem Cellsis segmented by following Product Types:

Type (Adult Stem Cells (Neuronal, Hematopoietic, Mesenchymal, Umbilical Cord, Others), Human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC), Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells), Application (Regenerative Medicine (Neurology, Orthopedics, Oncology, Hematology, Cardiovascular and Myocardial Infraction, Injuries, Diabetes, Liver Disorder, Incontinence, Others), Drug Discovery and Development), Technology (Cell Acquisition (Bone Marrow Harvest, Umbilical Blood Cord, Apheresis), Cell Production (Therapeutic Cloning, In-vitro Fertilization, Cell Culture, Isolation), Cryopreservation, Expansion and Sub-Culture), Therapy (Autologous, Allogeneic)

Region Included are: North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Oceania, South America, Middle East & Africa

Country Level Break-Up: United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Chile, South Africa, Nigeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Germany, United Kingdom (UK), the Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Belgium, Austria, Turkey, Russia, France, Poland, Israel, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, China, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, India, Australia and New Zealand etc.Enquire for customization in Report @:https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/enquiry-before-buy/72815-global-stem-cells-market-1

Strategic Points Covered in Table of Content of Global Stem Cells Market:

Chapter 1: Introduction, market driving force product Objective of Study and Research Scope the Global Stem Cells market

Chapter 2: Exclusive Summary the basic information of the Global Stem Cells Market.

Chapter 3: Displayingthe Market Dynamics- Drivers, Trends and Challenges of the Global Stem Cells

Chapter 4: Presenting the Global Stem Cells Market Factor Analysis Porters Five Forces, Supply/Value Chain, PESTEL analysis, Market Entropy, Patent/Trademark Analysis.

Chapter 5: Displaying the by Type, End User and Region 2013-2018

Chapter 6: Evaluating the leading manufacturers of the Global Stem Cells market which consists of its Competitive Landscape, Peer Group Analysis, BCG Matrix & Company Profile

Chapter 7: To evaluate the market by segments, by countries and by manufacturers with revenue share and sales by key countries in these various regions.

Chapter 8 & 9: Displaying the Appendix, Methodology and Data Source

Finally, Global Stem Cells Market is a valuable source of guidance for individuals and companies.

Data Sources & Methodology

The primary sources involves the industry experts from the Global Stem Cells Market including the management organizations, processing organizations, analytics service providers of the industrys value chain. All primary sources were interviewed to gather and authenticate qualitative & quantitative information and determine the future prospects.

In the extensive primary research process undertaken for this study, the primary sources Postal Surveys, telephone, Online & Face-to-Face Survey were considered to obtain and verify both qualitative and quantitative aspects of this research study. When it comes to secondary sources Companys Annual reports, press Releases, Websites, Investor Presentation, Conference Call transcripts, Webinar, Journals, Regulators, National Customs and Industry Associations were given primary weight-age.

Get More Information: https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/reports/72815-global-stem-cells-market-1

Thanks for reading this article; you can also get individual chapter wise section or region wise report version like North America, Europe or Asia.

About Author:

Advance Market Analytics is Global leaders of Market Research Industry provides the quantified B2B research to Fortune 500 companies on high growth emerging opportunities which will impact more than 80% of worldwide companies revenues.

Our Analyst is tracking high growth study with detailed statistical and in-depth analysis of market trends & dynamics that provide a complete overview of the industry. We follow an extensive research methodology coupled with critical insights related industry factors and market forces to generate the best value for our clients. We Provides reliable primary and secondary data sources, our analysts and consultants derive informative and usable data suited for our clients business needs. The research study enable clients to meet varied market objectives a from global footprint expansion to supply chain optimization and from competitor profiling to M&As.

Contact Us:

Craig Francis (PR & Marketing Manager)AMA Research & Media LLPUnit No. 429, Parsonage Road Edison, NJNew Jersey USA 08837Phone: +1 (206) 317 1218[emailprotected]

Connect with us athttps://www.linkedin.com/company/advance-market-analyticshttps://www.facebook.com/AMA-Research-Media-LLP-344722399585916https://twitter.com/amareport

More here:

Stem Cells Market Expected to Boost the Global Industry Growth in the Near Future - Germany English News

Read more
BioIVT Opens New Blood Donor Center to Support Boston-area Research into COVID-19 Therapies, Vaccines and Diagnostics – Bio-IT World

Located on the Tufts University Medford, MA campus, this new donor center will enable delivery of fresh blood, leukopaks and buffy coats for COVID-19, cell and gene therapy research within hours of collection

WESTBURY, NY - Apr 6, 2020 - BioIVT, a leading provider of research models and services for drug and diagnostic development, today announced the opening of its new blood donor center on the Tufts University campus in Medford, MA to support academic and pharmaceutical researchers involved in COVID-19, cell and gene therapy research.

BioIVT wants to play a leading role in supporting COVID-19 research efforts and blood donations are a vital resource for the research and development of new therapies, vaccines, and diagnostics. We have many years experience developing blood products, including blood-derived immune cells for cell and gene therapy research, and we want to make that expertise count, said BioIVT CEO Jeff Gatz. Researchers recognize and appreciate BioIVTs rapid response and commitment to high quality, fresh blood products and this new donor center will allow us to offer those attributes and services to additional US clients.

BioIVTs new Boston blood donor center is its seventh. The company has similar facilities located in California, Tennessee and Pennsylvania to serve US clients and in London, UK for EU-based clients.

While the initial focus at our Boston donor center will be on delivering fresh blood, leukopaks and buffy coats within hours of collection, we plan to add more capabilities and donors over time, said Jeff Widdoss, Vice President of Donor Center Operations at BioIVT.

Leukopaks, which contain concentrated white blood cells, are used to help identify promising new drug candidates, assess toxicity levels, and conduct stem cell and gene therapy research. They are particularly useful for researchers who need to obtain large numbers of leukocytes from a single donor.

BioIVT blood products can be supplied with specific clinical data, such as the donor age, ethnicity, gender, BMI and smoking status. Its leukopaks are also human leukocyte antigen (HLA), FC receptor and cytomegalovirus typed. HLA typing is used to match patients and donors for bone marrow or cord blood transplants. FC receptors play an important role in antibody-dependent immune responses.

COVID-19-related Precautions

Blood donor centers are considered essential businesses and will remain open during the COVID-19 quarantine. BioIVT is taking additional safety measures to protect both blood donors and its staff during this difficult time. It has instituted several social distancing measures, including increasing the space between chairs in the waiting room and between donor beds, and limiting the entrance of non-essential personnel. The screening rooms are disinfected between donors and all areas of the center continue to be cleaned at regular intervals.

As soon as each blood donor signs their informed consent form, their temperature is taken. If they have a fever, their appointment is postponed, and they are referred to their physician. Any donor who develops COVID-19 symptoms after donating blood is required to inform the center immediately.

All BioIVT blood collections are conducted under institutional review board (IRB) oversight and according to US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations and American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) guidelines.

Those who would like to donate blood at BioIVTs new Boston-area donor center should call 1-833-GO-4-CURE or visit http://www.biospecialty.com to make an appointment.

Further information about the products available from BioIVTs new donor center can be found at https://info.bioivt.com/ma-donor-ctr-req.

About BioIVT

BioIVT is a leading global provider of research models and value-added research services for drug discovery and development. We specialize in control and disease-state biospecimens including human and animal tissues, cell products, blood and other biofluids. Our unmatched portfolio of clinical specimens directly supports precision medicine research and the effort to improve patient outcomes by coupling comprehensive clinical data with donor samples. Our PHASEZERO Research Services team works collaboratively with clients to provide target and biomarker validation, phenotypic assays to characterize novel therapeutics, clinical assay development and in vitro hepatic modeling solutions. And as the premier supplier of hepatic products, including hepatocytes and subcellular fractions, BioIVT enables scientists to better understand the pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism of newly-discovered compounds and their effects on disease processes. By combining our technical expertise, exceptional customer service, and unparalleled access to biological specimens, BioIVT serves the research community as a trusted partner in elevating science. For more information, please visit http://www.bioivt.com or follow the company on Twitter @BioIVT.

Read more:

BioIVT Opens New Blood Donor Center to Support Boston-area Research into COVID-19 Therapies, Vaccines and Diagnostics - Bio-IT World

Read more
Curious about organ donation? Heres what you need to know – WHNT News 19

Doctor close-up of a doctor showing a picture of a kidney on a tablet in a hospital

With a float in this years Rose Bowl parade celebrating organ donation, there are a lot of questions many have about the process and why they should donate their organs.

Legacy of Hope, the Alabama organ donation alliance, said over 1,400 Alabama residents are waiting for a life-saving transplant, with 471 lives saved in 2018.

2.9 million residents across the state are on the registry.

Can I become an organ donor?

The federal government organ donation website, Organdonor.gov, says anyone 18 and older can join the national and state organ donor registries and donate as long as they and their organs are in healthy condition.

The Tennessee donor registry also allows anyone between 13 and 17 to join as long as they have a state ID, drivers license, or leaners permit. However, their parents will have the final say on organ and tissue donation if that decision needs to be made.

Even if you have health issues, you could still donate even one organ, which could save or improve a life.

What can be donated?

How do I register to donate?

There are two registries: The National Donor Registry and the state registry.

In Alabama and Tennessee, if you checked yes to organ donation when applying for or renewing your license, youre already on the state list.

If you didnt check yes, you can make your decision when applying for or renewing your drivers license or state ID at your local DMV or visit your states registry online.

In Alabama, Legacy of Hope manages the state registry, and you can sign up here.

In Tennessee, Donate Life Tennessee manages the state registry donation registry, and you can sign up here.

Youll need to check yes every time you renew to stay on the list.

You can join the national registry hereor in the iPhone Health app.

Who will get my organs if I decide to donate?

Its possible anybody could get your organs if you donate. People of different races match frequently, according to organdonor.gov.

The matching process includes many factors such as location, how long a recipient has been on the list, medical need, and determining blood and tissue type.

The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network handles the matching process and it varies based on the organ being transplanted.

Does my decision to donate affect the care I get in the hospital?

No. The medical teams saving your life will do everything in their power before donation becomes a possibility. A separate team handles organ retrieval should it be necessary.

The donation process only begins once brain death is confirmed. In those cases, a potential donor must have no brain activity and be unable to breathe without a machine.

Legacy of Hope says in Alabama, two doctors have to mutually agree that a patient is brain dead before the process starts.

Where can I find more information?

If youre trying to decide or just want more information, there are multiple resources.

See original here:

Curious about organ donation? Heres what you need to know - WHNT News 19

Read more
Highs and Lows of Stem Cell Therapies: Off- The-Shelf Solutions – P&T Community

NEW YORK, Jan. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ --

Report Includes: - An overview of recent advances in stem cell therapies and coverage of potential stem cells used for regenerative advanced therapies

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05835679/?utm_source=PRN

- Discussion on role of genomic and epigenomics manipulations in generating safe and effective treatment options - Identification of autologous and allogeneic cells and their usage in creating advanced therapy medical products (ATMPs) - Information on 3D cell culture and discussion on advances in gene editing and gene programming techniques such as CRIPSR/Cas9, TALEN, and ZINC fingers - Insights into commercial and regulatory landscape, and evaluation of challenges and opportunities for developing autologous and allogenic "off the shelf" solutions

Summary Stem cells are unique in their ability to divide and develop into different cell types that form tissues and organs in the body during development and growth.The stem cell's role is to repair impaired or depleted cells, tissues and organs in the body that are damaged by disease, injury, or normal wear and tear.

Stem cells are found in every organ, but are most abundant in bone marrow, where they help to restore the blood and immune system.

Stem cells may be derived from various sources, including - - Adult stem cells (ASCs): Derived from tissue after birth, these include bone marrow, brain, peripheral blood, skeletal muscle, skin, teeth, heat, gut, liver, ovarian epithelium and testis, as well as umbilical cord stem cells and blood. These cells are currently most widely used for cellbased therapies. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are derived from bone marrow, can give rise to red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, whereas mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are derived from the stroma and give rise to non-blood forming cells and tissues. - Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs): Derived from embryos, these include stems cell lines, aborted embryos or from miscarriages, unused in vitro fertilized embryos and cloned embryos. There are currently no clinically approved treatments for embryonic stem cells. - Inducible pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs): These are stem cells generated in the laboratory by reprogramming adult cells that have already differentiated into specific cells, such as liver cells. They are used either for research purposes (e.g., experimental medicine testing toxicity of new drugs) or are under research for potential future clinical use.

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05835679/?utm_source=PRN

About Reportlinker ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need - instantly, in one place.

__________________________ Contact Clare: clare@reportlinker.com US: (339)-368-6001 Intl: +1 339-368-6001

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/highs-and-lows-of-stem-cell-therapies-off--the-shelf-solutions-300982411.html

SOURCE Reportlinker

Read the original:

Highs and Lows of Stem Cell Therapies: Off- The-Shelf Solutions - P&T Community

Read more