India Stem Cell Market to 2026 by Product Type (Adult; Induced Pluripotent; Human Embryonic; Others), & Application (Regenerative Medicine Vs….

DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The "India Stem Cell Market by Product Type (Adult; Induced Pluripotent; Human Embryonic; Others), by Application (Regenerative Medicine Vs. Drug Discovery & Development), by Technology, by Region, Competition Forecast & Opportunities, FY 2026" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

The Indian Stem Cell Market is expected to grow at over 12% CAGR during FY 2021 - FY 2026.

Continuous advancements in tissue engineering is one of the prime factors boosting the Indian Stem Cell Market. Development of regenerative medicines coupled with growing cases of chronic and genetic diseases across the country are some of the other factors anticipated to drive the growth of the stem cell market during the forecast years. Moreover, availability of funds from the government and certain organizations is estimated to bode well for the growth of the Indian Stem Cell Market over the next five years.

The Indian Stem Cell Market is segmented based on product type, application, technology, and region. Based on product type, the market can be categorized into adult, induced pluripotent, human embryonic and others. Out of these, the adult stem cells segment dominated the market until FY 2020 and is further expected to maintain its leading position in the market during the forecast period as well on account of reduced contamination risk associated with sub-culturing.

Moreover, its compatibility with the human body is expected to drive the segment growth over the coming years. Additionally, less requirement for production labor is boosting the growth of adult stem cells segment.

Major players operating in the Indian Stem Cell Market include Reliance Life Sciences, LifeCell International Private Limited, Cryobanks International India Private Limited, Cordlife India, StemCyte India Therapeutics Private Limited, ReeLabs Private Limited, Stempeutics Research Private Limited, among others.

The companies are focusing on extensive research and developments activities in order to stay competitive in the market. Other competitive strategies include formation of alliances and partnerships.

Years considered for this report:

Report Scope:

In this report, the Indian Stem Cell Market has been segmented into following categories, in addition to the industry trends which have also been detailed below:

Market, By Product Type:

Market, By Application:

Market, By Technology:

Market, By Region:

Competitive Landscape

Company Profiles: Detailed analysis of the major companies present in the Indian Stem Cell Market.

Companies Mentioned

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/9dhnfz

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India Stem Cell Market to 2026 by Product Type (Adult; Induced Pluripotent; Human Embryonic; Others), & Application (Regenerative Medicine Vs....

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Inflammation produced by bacterial infection ‘alerts’ the brain stem cells – News-Medical.net

The study, directed by Isabel Farias and published in the November digital edition of the journal Cell Stem Cell, reveals that the inflammation produced by a bacterial infection 'alerts' the brain stem cells and prepares their activation for the production of new neurons. The study represents a new advance in the field of regenerative medicine.

The team of researchers from the Molecular Neurobiology group of the University of Valencia, led by the professor of Cell Biology Isabel Farias, has just published in the journal Cell Stem Cell the results of a work that sheds light on the role of inflammation in the normal programming of adult brain stem cell activation to produce new neurons throughout life.

Our tissues are constantly renewed thanks to stem cells, which generate new specialized cells to replace those that are lost through "wear and tear". These stem cells are located in very specific locations within tissues, which are known as microenvironments or niches, and in which stem cells interact with other types of cells.

The new findings indicate that brain stem cells also respond to changes that occur outside the brain. This study, carried out in mice, has verified that the inflammation produced by a bacterial infection in any part of the body is capable of temporarily activating brain stem cells and preparing them for action. When the inflammation subsides, these cells return to their quiescent state.

The work allows us to better understand the relationships between stem cells and the systemic environment, that is, the rest of the organism, as knowledge on the subject is very limited. We are used to stem cells responding to their closest microenvironment, but evidence is beginning to emerge showing that they can respond to what is happening in any part of the body thanks to molecules that are distributed through the circulatory system."

Isabel Farias, Professor of Cell Biology, University of Valencia

The work of the research team contributes, once again, new data to the study and advancement of regenerative medicine, a field of science that seeks therapeutic solutions based on stem cells for degenerative processes, such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases in which neuroinflammation is usually detected.

"We have always been more concerned about chronic inflammation that is associated with many diseases and is very negative for our organs, but it is a defence mechanism against damage or infection", explains Jos Manuel Morante, co-director of the work. "For this reason, it is important to find out the role of inflammation in the regulation of stem cells", he concludes.

Several doctors from the University of Valencia (Germn Belenguer, Ana Domingo, Toni Jordn, Sacri R. Ferrn and Jos Manuel Morante) and researchers in training Pere Duart and Laura Blasco have participated in the research. Farias' team belongs to the Molecular Neurobiology group of the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine of the same University, the Centre for Networked Biomedical Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIBERNED) and the RETIC of Cell Therapy of the Carlos III Health Institute, and is a Prometheus group of excellence of the Valencian Government.

Source:

Journal reference:

Belenguer, G., et al. (2020) Adult Neural Stem Cells Are Alerted by Systemic Inflammation through TNF- Receptor Signaling. Cell Stem Cell. doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2020.10.016.

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Mechanisms of Telomere Protection Are Unique in Stem Cells – Technology Networks

Telomeres are specialized structures at the end of chromosomes which protect our DNA and ensure healthy division of cells. According to a new study from researchers at the Francis Crick Institute published in Nature, the mechanisms of telomere protection are surprisingly unique in stem cells.

For the last 20 years, researchers have been working to understand how telomeres protect chromosome ends from being incorrectly repaired and joined together because this has important implications for our understanding of cancer and aging.

In healthy cells, this protection is very efficient, but as we age our telomeres get progressively shorter, eventually becoming so short that they lose some of these protective functions. In healthy cells, this contributes to the progressive decline in our health and fitness as we age. Conversely, telomere shortening poses a protective barrier to tumor development, which cancer cells must solve in order to divide indefinitely.

In somatic cells, which are all the cells in the adult body except stem cells and gametes, we know that a protein called TRF2 helps to protect the telomere. It does this by binding to and stabilizing a loop structure, called a t-loop, which masks the end of the chromosome. When the TRF2 protein is removed, these loops do not form and the chromosome ends fuse together, leading to "spaghetti chromosomes" and killing the cell.

However, in this latest study, Crick researchers have found that when the TRF2 protein is removed from mouse embryonic stem cells, t-loops continue to form, chromosome ends remain protected and the cells are largely unaffected.

As embryonic stem cells differentiate into somatic cells, this unique mechanism of end protection is lost and both t-loops and chromosome end protection become reliant on TRF2. This suggests that somatic and stem cells protect their chromosome ends in fundamentally different ways.

"Now we know that TRF2 isn't needed for t-loop formation in stem cells, we infer there must be some other factor that does the same job or a different mechanism to stabilize t-loops in these cells, and we want to know what it is," says Philip Ruis, first author of the paper and PhD student in the DNA Double Strand Breaks Repair Metabolism Laboratory at the Crick.

"For some reason, stem cells have evolved this distinct mechanism of protecting their chromosomes ends, that differs from somatic cells. Why they have, we have no idea, but it's intriguing. It opens up many questions that will keep us busy for many years to come."

The team have also helped to clarify years of uncertainty about whether the t-loops themselves play a part in protecting the chromosome ends. They found that telomeres in stem cells with t-loops but without TRF2 are still protected, suggesting the t-loop structure itself has a protective role.

"Rather than totally contradicting years of telomere research, our study refines it in a very unique way. Basically, we've shown that stem cells protect their chromosome ends differently to what we previously thought, but this still requires a t-loop," says Simon Boulton, paper author and group leader in the DNA Double-Strand Breaks Repair Metabolism Laboratory at the Crick.

"A better understanding of how telomeres work, and how they protect the ends of chromosomes could offer crucial insights into the underlying processes that lead to premature aging and cancer."

The team worked in collaboration with Tony Cesare in Sydney and other researchers across the Crick, including Kathy Niakan, of the Human Embryo and Stem Cell Laboratory, and James Briscoe, of the Developmental Dynamics Laboratory at the Crick. "This is a prime example of what the Crick was set up to promote. We've been able to really benefit from our collaborator's expertise and the access that was made possible by the Crick's unique facilities," says Simon.

The researchers will continue this work, aiming to understand in detail the mechanisms of telomere protection in somatic and embryonic cells.

Reference: Ruis P, Van Ly D, Borel V, et al. TRF2-independent chromosome end protection during pluripotency. Nature. 2020. doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2960-y

This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

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Cell Therapy Manufacturing Market to be Worth USD 8 billion by 2030, predicts Roots Analysis – Cheshire Media

Roots Analysis has announced the addition of Cell Therapy Manufacturing Market (2nd Edition), 2018-2030 report to its list of offerings.

Natasha Thakur, the principal analyst, stated, The growing number of cell therapy candidates continues to create an increasing demand for facilities that offer manufacturing services for these complex pharmacological interventions. Presently, over 145 companies / organizations are actively offering manufacturing services for such products. The installed global manufacturing capacity is estimated to be over 1 billion sq ft, with the maximum capacity available in North America

The report presents opinions on several key aspects of the market. Among other elements, it includes:

The report features inputs from a number of eminent industry stakeholders. Thakur remarked, Most of the experts we spoke to confirmed that the manufacturing of cell therapies is largely being outsourced due to exorbitant costs associated with setting-up such facilities. The report features detailed transcripts of discussions held with the following experts:

The research also includes detailed profiles of the following players:

For additional details, please visithttps://www.rootsanalysis.com/reports/view_document/cell-therapy-manufacturing-market-2nd-edition-2018-2030/209.hl or email [emailprotected]

Contact:

Gaurav Chaudhary

+1-604-595-4954

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Commonly used antibiotic shows promise for combating Zika infections – National Institutes of Health

News Release

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

NIH preclinical study suggests FDA-approved tetracycline-based antibiotics may slow infection and reduce neurological problems.

In 2015, hundreds of children were born with brain deformities resulting from a global outbreak of Zika virus infections. Recently, National Institutes of Health researchers used a variety of advanced drug screening techniques to test out more than 10,000 compounds in search of a cure. To their surprise, they found that the widely used antibiotic methacycline was effective at preventing brain infections and reducing neurological problems associated with the virus in mice. In addition, they found that drugs originally designed to combat Alzheimers disease and inflammation may also help fight infections.

Around the world, the Zika outbreak produced devastating, long-term neurological problems for many children and their families. Although the infections are down, the threat remains, said Avindra Nath, M.D., senior investigator at the NIHs National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and a senior author of the study published in PNAS. We hope these promising results are a good first step to preparing the world for combating the next potential outbreak.

The study was a collaboration between scientists on Dr. Naths team and researchers in laboratories led by Anton Simeonov, Ph.D., scientific director at the NIHs National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and Radhakrishnan Padmanabhan, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology & Immunology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, D.C.

The Zika virus is primarily spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. In 2015 and 2016, at least 60 countries reported infections. Some of these countries also reported a high incidence of infected mothers giving birth to babies born with abnormally small heads resulting from a developmental brain disorder called fetal microcephaly. In some adults, infections were the cause of several neurological disorders including Guillain-Barr syndrome, encephalitis, and myelitis. Although many scientists have tried, they have yet to discover an effective treatment or vaccination against the virus.

In this study, the researchers looked for drugs that prevent the virus from reproducing by blocking the activity of a protein called NS2B-NS3 Zika virus protease. The Zika virus is a protein capsule that carries long strings of RNA-encoded instructions for manufacturing more viral proteins. During an infection, the virus injects the RNA into a cell, resulting in the production of these proteins, which are strung together, side-by-side, like the parts in a plastic model airplane kit. The NS2B-NS3 protease then snaps off each protein, all of which are critical for assembling new viral particles.

Proteases act like scissors. Blocking protease activity is an effective strategy for counteracting many viruses, said Rachel Abrams, Ph.D., an organic chemist in Dr. Naths lab and the study leader. We wanted to look as far and wide as possible for drugs that could prevent the protease from snipping the Zika virus polyprotein into its active pieces.

To find candidates, Dr. Abrams worked with scientists on Dr. Simeonovs and Dr. Padmanabhans teams to create assays, or tests, for assessing the ability of drugs to block NS2B-NS3 Zika virus protease activity in plates containing hundreds of tiny test tubes. Each assay was tailored to a different screening, or sifting, technique. They then used these assays to simultaneously try out thousands of candidates stored in three separate libraries.

One preliminary screen of 2,000 compounds suggested that commonly used, tetracycline-based antibiotic drugs, like methacycline, may be effective at blocking the protease.

Meanwhile, a large-scale screen of more than 10,000 compounds helped identify an investigational anti-inflammatory medicine, called MK-591, and a failed anti-Alzheimers disease drug, called JNJ-404 as potential candidates. A virtual screen of over 130,000 compounds was also used to help spot candidates. For this, the researchers fed the other screening results into a computer and then used artificial intelligence-based programs to learn what makes a compound good at blocking NS2B-NS3 Zika virus protease activity.

These results show that taking advantage of the latest technological advances can help researchers find treatments that can be repurposed to fight other diseases, said Dr. Simeonov.

The Zika virus is known to preferentially infect stem cells in the brain. Scientists suspect this is the reason why infections cause more harm to newborn babies than to adults. Experiments on neural stem cells grown in petri dishes indicated that all three drugs identified in this study may counteract these problems. Treating the cells with methacycline, MK-591, or JNJ-404 reduced Zika virus infections.

Because tetracyclines are U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs that are known to cross the placenta of pregnant women, the researchers focused on methacycline and found that it may reduce some neurodevelopmental problems caused by the Zika virus. For instance, Zika-infected newborn mice that were treated with methacycline had better balance and could turn over more easily than ones that were given a placebo. Brain examinations suggested this was because the antibiotic reduced infections and neural damage. Nevertheless, the antibiotics did not completely counteract harm caused by the Zika virus. The weight of mice infected with the virus was lower than control mice regardless of whether the mice were treated with methacycline.

These results suggest that tetracycline-based antibiotics may at least be effective at preventing the neurological problems associated with Zika virus infections, said Dr. Abrams. Given that they are widely used, we hope that we can rapidly test their potential in clinical trials.

Article:

Abrams, R.P.M., Yasgar, A. et al., Therapeutic Candidates for the Zika Virus Identified by a High Throughput Screen for Zika Protease Inhibitors. PNAS, November 23, 2020 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2005463117.

These studies were supported by NIH Intramural Research Programs at NINDS and NCATS (TR000291) and an NIH grant (AI109185).

For more information:

NINDS (https://www.ninds.nih.gov) is the nations leading funder of research on the brain and nervous system.The mission of NINDS is to seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system and to use that knowledge to reduce the burden of neurological disease.

About the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS): NCATS conducts and supports research on the science and operation of translation the process by which interventions to improve health are developed and implemented to allow more treatments to get to more patients more quickly. For more information about how NCATS helps shorten the journey from scientific observation to clinical intervention, visit ncats.nih.gov.

About the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: NIAID conducts and supports research at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID website.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH):NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov.

NIHTurning Discovery Into Health

###

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Researchers grow first plant-based gel to help organoid development for biomedical applications – Microbioz India

Monash University researchers have created the worlds first bioactive plant-based nanocellulose hydrogel to support organoid growth and help significantly reduce the costs of studies into cancer and COVID-19.

This discovery by researchers at BioPRIA (Bioresource Processing Institute of Australia), Monash Universitys Department of Chemical Engineering and the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute will develop organoids cheaper, faster and more ethically.

The hydrogel can also improve drug screening and disease modelling for infectious diseases, like COVID-19; metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes; and cancer.

The findings, published inAdvanced Science, emerge as a promising finding for growth of organoids for essential laboratory testing across the world. With additional testing, this hydrogel could be available to researchers and health professionals across the world in less than 12 months.

Nanocellulose gels cost just cents for every 10ml used, compared to $600 or more for the current gold standard.

Above all, nanocellulose gels are completely plant-based, preventing the harvesting of animal organs and unknown biomolecules for any advanced medical testing.

Professor Gil Garnier and Dr Rodrigo Curvello from BioPRIA within Monash Universitys Department of Chemical Engineering led the study.

Organoids provide a robust model for key applications in biomedicine, including drug screening and disease modelling. But current approaches remain expensive, biochemically variable and undefined.

Gil Garnier, Director of BioPRIA, Monash University

These are major obstacles for fundamental research studies and the translation of organoids to clinics. Alternative matrices able to sustain organoid systems are required to reduce costs drastically and to eliminate the unreliability of unknown biomolecules.

As nanocellulose hydrogel is animal-free, its composition is controlled perfectly and reproducible unlike the current progress and fully mimic the human body conditions.

Organoids are three-dimensional, miniaturised and simplified versions of organs produced in vitro that can replicate behaviours and functionalities of developed organs.

Commonly referred to as organs in a dish or mini-organs, organoids are an excellent tool to study basic biological processes. Through organoids, we can understand how cells interact in an organ, how diseases affect them and the effects of drugs in disease reduction.

Organoids are generated from embryonic, adult, pluripotent orinduced pluripotent stem cells, as well as from primary healthy or cancerous tissues.

For long-term use, organoids are commonly embedded within an Engelbreth-Holm Swarm (EHS) matrix derived from the reconstituted basement membrane of mouse sarcoma.

Currently, organoid culture is dependent of this expensive and undefined tumour-derived material that hinders its application in high-throughput screening, regenerative medicine and diagnostics.

Our study was essentially able to use an engineered plant-based nanocellulose hydrogel that can replicate the growth of small intestinal organoids derived from mice, Dr Curvello said.

It is essentially made from 99.9% water and only 0.1% solids, functionalised with a single cell adhesive peptide. Cellulose nanofibers are linked with salts that provide the microenvironment needed for small intestinal organoid growth and proliferation.

Engineered nanocellulose gel represents a sustainable alternative for the growth of organoids, contributing to reducing the costs of studies on diseases of global concern, particularly in developing countries.

Source:

Journal reference:

Curvello, R.,et al.(2020) Engineered PlantBased Nanocellulose Hydrogel for Small Intestinal Organoid Growth.Advanced Science.doi.org/10.1002/advs.202002135.

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Researchers grow first plant-based gel to help organoid development for biomedical applications - Microbioz India

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Global Cell Harvesting Market to Reach US$381,4 Million by the Year 2027 – Salamanca Press

NEW YORK, Nov. 25, 2020 /PRNewswire/ --Amid the COVID-19 crisis, the global market for Cell Harvesting estimated at US$233.2 Million in the year 2020, is projected to reach a revised size of US$381.4 Million by 2027, growing at a CAGR of 7.3% over the period 2020-2027.Manual, one of the segments analyzed in the report, is projected to grow at a 7.9% CAGR to reach US$284.4 Million by the end of the analysis period. After an early analysis of the business implications of the pandemic and its induced economic crisis, growth in the Automated segment is readjusted to a revised 5.6% CAGR for the next 7-year period. This segment currently accounts for a 28.3% share of the global Cell Harvesting market.

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05798117/?utm_source=PRN

The U.S. Accounts for Over 30.9% of Global Market Size in 2020, While China is Forecast to Grow at a 10.4% CAGR for the Period of 2020-2027

The Cell Harvesting market in the U.S. is estimated at US$72 Million in the year 2020. The country currently accounts for a 30.86% share in the global market. China, the world second largest economy, is forecast to reach an estimated market size of US$34.9 Million in the year 2027 trailing a CAGR of 10.4% through 2027. Among the other noteworthy geographic markets are Japan and Canada, each forecast to grow at 6.1% and 7% respectively over the 2020-2027 period. Within Europe, Germany is forecast to grow at approximately 6.6% CAGR while Rest of European market (as defined in the study) will reach US$34.9 Million by the year 2027.We bring years of research experience to this 5th edition of our report. The 226-page report presents concise insights into how the pandemic has impacted production and the buy side for 2020 and 2021. A short-term phased recovery by key geography is also addressed.

Competitors identified in this market include, among others,

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05798117/?utm_source=PRN

I. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & REPORT SCOPE I-1

II. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY II-1

1. MARKET OVERVIEW II-1Cell Harvesting - A Prelude II-1Impact of Covid-19 and a Looming Global Recession II-1With Stem Cells Holding Potential to Emerge as Savior forHealthcare System Struggling with COVID-19 Crisis, Demand forCell Harvesting to Grow II-1Select Clinical Trials in Progress for MSCs in the Treatment ofCOVID-19 II-2Lack of Antiviral Therapy Brings Spotlight on MSCs as PotentialOption to Treat Severe Cases of COVID-19 II-3Stem Cells Garner Significant Attention amid COVID-19 Crisis II-3Growing R&D Investments & Rising Incidence of Chronic Diseasesto Drive the Global Cell Harvesting Market over the Long-term II-3US Dominates the Global Market, Asia-Pacific to ExperienceLucrative Growth Rate II-4Biopharmaceutical & Biotechnology Firms to Remain Key End-User II-4Remarkable Progress in Stem Cell Research Unleashes UnlimitedAvenues for Regenerative Medicine and Drug Development II-4Drug Development II-5Therapeutic Potential II-5

2. FOCUS ON SELECT PLAYERS II-6Recent Market Activity II-7Innovations and Advancements II-7

3. MARKET TRENDS & DRIVERS II-8Development of Regenerative Medicine Accelerates Demand forCell Harvesting II-8The Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine toDrive the Cell Harvesting Market II-8Rise in Volume of Orthopedic Procedures Boosts Prospects forStem Cell, Driving the Cell Harvesting II-9Exhibit 1: Global Orthopedic Surgical Procedure Volume (2010-2020) (in Million) II-11Increasing Demand for Stem Cell Based Bone Grafts: PromisingGrowth Ahead for Cell Harvesting II-11Spectacular Advances in Stem Cell R&D Open New Horizons forRegenerative Medicine II-12Exhibit 2: Global Regenerative Medicines Market by Category(2019): Percentage Breakdown for Biomaterials, Stem CellTherapies and Tissue Engineering II-13Stem Cell Transplants Drive the Demand for Cell Harvesting II-13Rise in Number of Hematopoietic Stem Cell TransplantationProcedures Propels Market Expansion II-15Growing Incidence of Chronic Diseases to Boost the Demand forCell Harvesting II-16Exhibit 3: Global Cancer Incidence: Number of New Cancer Casesin Million for the Years 2018, 2020, 2025, 2030, 2035 and 2040 II-17Exhibit 4: Global Number of New Cancer Cases and Cancer-relatedDeaths by Cancer Site for 2018 II-18Exhibit 5: Number of New Cancer Cases and Deaths (in Million)by Region for 2018 II-19Exhibit 6: Fatalities by Heart Conditions: Estimated PercentageBreakdown for Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease,Stroke, and Others II-19Exhibit 7: Rising Diabetes Prevalence Presents Opportunity forCell Harvesting: Number of Adults (20-79) with Diabetes (inMillions) by Region for 2017 and 2045 II-20Ageing Demographics to Drive Demand for Stem Cell Banking II-20Global Aging Population Statistics - Opportunity Indicators II-21Exhibit 8: Expanding Elderly Population Worldwide: Breakdown ofNumber of People Aged 65+ Years in Million by GeographicRegion for the Years 2019 and 2030 II-21Exhibit 9: Life Expectancy for Select Countries in Number ofYears: 2019 II-22High Cell Density as Major Bottleneck Leads to Innovative CellHarvesting Methods II-22Advanced Harvesting Systems to Overcome Centrifugation Issues II-23Sophisticated Filters for Filtration Challenges II-23Innovations in Closed Systems Boost Efficiency & Productivityof Cell Harvesting II-23Enhanced Harvesting and Separation of Micro-Carrier Beads II-24

4. GLOBAL MARKET PERSPECTIVE II-25Table 1: World Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvesting byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-25

Table 2: World Historic Review for Cell Harvesting byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-26

Table 3: World 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forUSA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest ofWorld Markets for Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 II-27

Table 4: World Current & Future Analysis for Manual byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-28

Table 5: World Historic Review for Manual by Geographic Region- USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest ofWorld Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-29

Table 6: World 15-Year Perspective for Manual by GeographicRegion - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada,Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years2012, 2020 & 2027 II-30

Table 7: World Current & Future Analysis for Automated byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-31

Table 8: World Historic Review for Automated by GeographicRegion - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific andRest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales inUS$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-32

Table 9: World 15-Year Perspective for Automated by GeographicRegion - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada,Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years2012, 2020 & 2027 II-33

Table 10: World Current & Future Analysis for Peripheral Bloodby Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-34

Table 11: World Historic Review for Peripheral Blood byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-35

Table 12: World 15-Year Perspective for Peripheral Blood byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forUSA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest ofWorld for Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 II-36

Table 13: World Current & Future Analysis for Bone Marrow byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-37

Table 14: World Historic Review for Bone Marrow by GeographicRegion - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific andRest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales inUS$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-38

Table 15: World 15-Year Perspective for Bone Marrow byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forUSA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest ofWorld for Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 II-39

Table 16: World Current & Future Analysis for Umbilical Cord byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-40

Table 17: World Historic Review for Umbilical Cord byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-41

Table 18: World 15-Year Perspective for Umbilical Cord byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forUSA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest ofWorld for Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 II-42

Table 19: World Current & Future Analysis for Adipose Tissue byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-43

Table 20: World Historic Review for Adipose Tissue byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-44

Table 21: World 15-Year Perspective for Adipose Tissue byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forUSA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest ofWorld for Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 II-45

Table 22: World Current & Future Analysis for OtherApplications by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China,Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - IndependentAnalysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through2027 II-46

Table 23: World Historic Review for Other Applications byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-47

Table 24: World 15-Year Perspective for Other Applications byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forUSA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest ofWorld for Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 II-48

Table 25: World Current & Future Analysis for Biotech &Biopharma Companies by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan,China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets -Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years2020 through 2027 II-49

Table 26: World Historic Review for Biotech & BiopharmaCompanies by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China,Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - IndependentAnalysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through2019 II-50

Table 27: World 15-Year Perspective for Biotech & BiopharmaCompanies by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of ValueSales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific andRest of World for Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 II-51

Table 28: World Current & Future Analysis for ResearchInstitutes by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China,Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - IndependentAnalysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through2027 II-52

Table 29: World Historic Review for Research Institutes byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-53

Table 30: World 15-Year Perspective for Research Institutes byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forUSA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest ofWorld for Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 II-54

Table 31: World Current & Future Analysis for Other End-Uses byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-55

Table 32: World Historic Review for Other End-Uses byGeographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe,Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysisof Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 II-56

Table 33: World 15-Year Perspective for Other End-Uses byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forUSA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest ofWorld for Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 II-57

III. MARKET ANALYSIS III-1

GEOGRAPHIC MARKET ANALYSIS III-1

UNITED STATES III-1Increasing Research on Stem Cells for Treating COVID-19 todrive the Cell Harvesting Market III-1Rising Investments in Stem Cell-based Research Favors CellHarvesting Market III-1Exhibit 10: Stem Cell Research Funding in the US (in US$Million) for the Years 2011 through 2017 III-2A Strong Regenerative Medicine Market Drives Cell HarvestingDemand III-2Arthritis III-3Exhibit 11: Percentage of Population Diagnosed with Arthritisby Age Group III-3Rapidly Ageing Population: A Major Driving Demand for CellHarvesting Market III-4Exhibit 12: North American Elderly Population by Age Group(1975-2050) III-4Increasing Incidence of Chronic Diseases Drives Focus onto CellHarvesting III-5Exhibit 13: CVD in the US: Cardiovascular Disease* Prevalencein Adults by Gender & Age Group III-5Rising Cancer Cases Spur Growth in Cell Harvesting Market III-5Exhibit 14: Estimated Number of New Cancer Cases and Deaths inthe US (2019) III-6Exhibit 15: Estimated New Cases of Blood Cancers in the US(2020) - Lymphoma, Leukemia, Myeloma III-7Exhibit 16: Estimated New Cases of Leukemia in the US: 2020 III-7Market Analytics III-8Table 34: USA Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvesting byType - Manual and Automated - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-8

Table 35: USA Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by Type -Manual and Automated Markets - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-9

Table 36: USA 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting by Type -Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Manual and Automatedfor the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-10

Table 37: USA Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications - Independent Analysis ofAnnual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-11

Table 38: USA Historic Review for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications Markets - IndependentAnalysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through2019 III-12

Table 39: USA 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forPeripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord, Adipose Tissueand Other Applications for the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-13

Table 40: USA Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvesting byEnd-Use - Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutesand Other End-Uses - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales inUS$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-14

Table 41: USA Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by End-Use -Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and OtherEnd-Uses Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-15

Table 42: USA 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byEnd-Use - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Biotech &Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and Other End-Uses forthe Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-16

CANADA III-17Market Overview III-17Exhibit 17: Number of New Cancer Cases in Canada: 2019 III-17Market Analytics III-18Table 43: Canada Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Type - Manual and Automated - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-18

Table 44: Canada Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by Type -Manual and Automated Markets - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-19

Table 45: Canada 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byType - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Manual andAutomated for the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-20

Table 46: Canada Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Application - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications - Independent Analysis ofAnnual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-21

Table 47: Canada Historic Review for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications Markets - IndependentAnalysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through2019 III-22

Table 48: Canada 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forPeripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord, Adipose Tissueand Other Applications for the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-23

Table 49: Canada Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby End-Use - Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutesand Other End-Uses - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales inUS$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-24

Table 50: Canada Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by End-Use- Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and OtherEnd-Uses Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-25

Table 51: Canada 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byEnd-Use - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Biotech &Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and Other End-Uses forthe Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-26

JAPAN III-27Increasing Demand for Regenerative Medicine in GeriatricHealthcare and Cancer Care to Drive Demand for Cell Harvesting III-27Exhibit 18: Japanese Population by Age Group (2015 & 2040):Percentage Share Breakdown of Population for 0-14, 15-64 and65 & Above Age Groups III-27Exhibit 19: Cancer Related Incidence and Deaths by Site inJapan: 2018 III-28Market Analytics III-29Table 52: Japan Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Type - Manual and Automated - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-29

Table 53: Japan Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by Type -Manual and Automated Markets - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-30

Table 54: Japan 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting by Type- Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Manual and Automatedfor the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-31

Table 55: Japan Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Application - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications - Independent Analysis ofAnnual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-32

Table 56: Japan Historic Review for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications Markets - IndependentAnalysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through2019 III-33

Table 57: Japan 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forPeripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord, Adipose Tissueand Other Applications for the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-34

Table 58: Japan Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby End-Use - Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutesand Other End-Uses - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales inUS$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-35

Table 59: Japan Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by End-Use -Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and OtherEnd-Uses Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-36

Table 60: Japan 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byEnd-Use - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Biotech &Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and Other End-Uses forthe Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-37

CHINA III-38Rising Incidence of Cancer Drives Cell Harvesting Market III-38Exhibit 20: Number of New Cancer Cases Diagnosed (in Thousands)in China: 2018 III-38Market Analytics III-39Table 61: China Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Type - Manual and Automated - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-39

Table 62: China Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by Type -Manual and Automated Markets - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-40

Table 63: China 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting by Type -Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Manual and Automatedfor the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-41

Table 64: China Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Application - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications - Independent Analysis ofAnnual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-42

Table 65: China Historic Review for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications Markets - IndependentAnalysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through2019 III-43

Table 66: China 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forPeripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord, Adipose Tissueand Other Applications for the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-44

Table 67: China Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby End-Use - Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutesand Other End-Uses - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales inUS$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-45

Table 68: China Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by End-Use -Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and OtherEnd-Uses Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-46

Table 69: China 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byEnd-Use - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Biotech &Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and Other End-Uses forthe Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-47

EUROPE III-48Cancer in Europe: Key Statistics III-48Exhibit 21: Cancer Incidence in Europe: Number of New CancerCases (in Thousands) by Site for 2018 III-48Ageing Population to Drive Demand for Cell Harvesting Market III-49Exhibit 22: European Population by Age Group (2016, 2030 &2050): Percentage Share Breakdown by Age Group for 0-14, 15-64, and 65 & Above III-49Market Analytics III-50Table 70: Europe Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Geographic Region - France, Germany, Italy, UK and Rest ofEurope Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 III-50

Table 71: Europe Historic Review for Cell Harvesting byGeographic Region - France, Germany, Italy, UK and Rest ofEurope Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-51

Table 72: Europe 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forFrance, Germany, Italy, UK and Rest of Europe Markets for Years2012, 2020 & 2027 III-52

Table 73: Europe Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Type - Manual and Automated - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-53

Table 74: Europe Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by Type -Manual and Automated Markets - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-54

Table 75: Europe 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byType - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Manual andAutomated for the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-55

Table 76: Europe Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Application - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications - Independent Analysis ofAnnual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-56

Table 77: Europe Historic Review for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications Markets - IndependentAnalysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through2019 III-57

Table 78: Europe 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forPeripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord, Adipose Tissueand Other Applications for the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-58

Table 79: Europe Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby End-Use - Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutesand Other End-Uses - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales inUS$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-59

Table 80: Europe Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by End-Use -Biotech & Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and OtherEnd-Uses Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-60

Table 81: Europe 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byEnd-Use - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Biotech &Biopharma Companies, Research Institutes and Other End-Uses forthe Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-61

FRANCE III-62Table 82: France Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Type - Manual and Automated - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-62

Table 83: France Historic Review for Cell Harvesting by Type -Manual and Automated Markets - Independent Analysis of AnnualSales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through 2019 III-63

Table 84: France 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byType - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Manual andAutomated for the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-64

Table 85: France Current & Future Analysis for Cell Harvestingby Application - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications - Independent Analysis ofAnnual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-65

Table 86: France Historic Review for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord,Adipose Tissue and Other Applications Markets - IndependentAnalysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2012 through2019 III-66

Table 87: France 15-Year Perspective for Cell Harvesting byApplication - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales forPeripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, Umbilical Cord, Adipose Tissueand Other Applications for the Years 2012, 2020 & 2027 III-67

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Global Cell Harvesting Market to Reach US$381,4 Million by the Year 2027 - Salamanca Press

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Mesoblast inks deal with Novartis to bring Covid stem-cell therapy to – The Pharma Letter

Accelerating the development and commercialization of their anti-inflammatory stem-cell therapy, Australias

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Mesoblast inks deal with Novartis to bring Covid stem-cell therapy to - The Pharma Letter

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Jakafi and Dacogen May Improve Overall Survival in Patients with MPN – Curetoday.com

Results from a phase 2 study demonstrated that treatment with Jakafi (ruxolitinib) and Dacogen (decitabine) was well tolerated and contributed to favorable overall survival (OS) in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) in the accelerated or blast phase.

MPN is a blood cancer that develops when a stem cell mutation in the bone marrow leads to an overproduction of white cells, red cells and/or platelets. The accelerated phase of MPN refers to when 10% to 19% of blasts, or immature blood cells, are in the blood circulating through the body or in the bone marrow, whereas the blast phase refers to 20% or greater blasts in the circulating blood or bone marrow, according to the study published in Blood Advances.

This study was important, as patients with an antecedent (pre-existing) myeloproliferative neoplasm that evolves into an acute myeloid leukemia have a dismal prognosis of several months, and induction chemotherapy alone does not improve outcome unless followed by consolidation hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, Dr. John O. Mascarenhas, director of the adult leukemia program and leader of the myeloproliferative neoplasm clinical research program at Tisch Cancer Institute at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, said in an interview with CURE.

The study authors previously assessed this therapy in a multicenter, phase 1 trial.

We had previously shown that the epigenetic modifying agent decitabine can be administered (on) an outpatient (basis) and improve outcome with a median survival of nine to 10 months, Mascarenhas said. This prospective, phase 2, multicenter, investigated-initiated trial built on the phase 1 trial of combination decitabine and ruxolitinib based on supportive preclinical data from the laboratory of our collaborator, (Dr.) Ross Levine.

In this current trial, 25 patients (median age, 71 years; 56% women) with MPN either in the accelerated phase (10 patients; median age, 70.1 years; 70% women) or blast phase (15 patients; median age, 71.6 years; 46.7% women) were treated with Jakafi and Dacogen. A 25 mg dose of Jakafi was administered orally twice per day for 28 days in addition to a 20 mg/m2 dose of Dacogen intravenously during days 8 through 12. After that first cycle, the dose of Jakafi was reduced to 10 mg.

The prespecified primary endpoint, or goal, was best response by six months, and the predetermined secondary endpoint focused on the safety and tolerability of Jakafi and Dacogen. Study authors defined OS as the time from the first dose of Jakafi to death from any cause.

During follow-up, 19 patients died from causes including respiratory failure, disease progression, sepsis and pneumonia. Patients in this study had a median OS of 9.5 months. Overall response rate, which included complete remission, incomplete platelet recovery and partial remission, occurred in 44% of patients. Response to this treatment was not linked with improved survival.

This combination is well tolerated and can provide spleen symptom benefit and survival advantage compared to cytotoxic chemotherapy, Mascarenhas said. This study supports the use of this approach to maintain ambulatory care of these very advanced patients with a limited lifespan. This is one therapeutic approach that is now included in the (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) guidelines.

Mascarenhas added that more research is needed in this area. Ultimately, we need to identify active agents that can fully eliminate the malignant hematopoietic stem cell and attain molecular remissions that afford patients long-term survival, he said. This is an ongoing area of active translational research of our group.

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Asymmetrex Publishes the First Report of Immortal DNA Strands in Human Stem Cells – PR Web

Example of a tissue stem cell (left) holding on to its immortal DNA strands after dividing to produce a maturing tissue cell (right).

BOSTON (PRWEB) November 18, 2020

What does it mean for multiplying cells in the body to be immortal? The cell DNA is being replicated over and over again while being divided equally between new cells produced by cell divisions. All the new cell components produced by the DNA code are mixing with the old cell components and being divided between the new cells. So, every cell is a new cell. There is nothing really immortal about any of them. Right?

Not quite. Stem cells responsible for renewing other mature body cells are different. For a long time, tissue cell scientists had a somewhat nebulous idea that stem cells had a special longevity in organs and tissues that they were immortal cells, lasting for as long as the human lifespan. However, no one had a molecular concept for this idea of stem cell immortality until John Cairns, a pioneer of DNA replication, started thinking about DNA mutations and cancer in the 1970s.

Cairns predicted that stem cells did something unique with their DNA code. He said they held on to one strand of every one of their many chromosomes and never shared those DNA strands with the tissue cells they renewed. Cairns called these immortal DNA strands. Cairns argued that immortal DNA strands must exist to explain how immortal stem cells avoid higher cancer rates.

Asymmetrex director James Sherley calls the immortal strand hypothesis the Carpenters Rule for stem cells. Good carpenters avoid creeping measurement errors by using a ruler or the same piece of wood to measure duplicates. Too many DNA duplication errors in cells make them cancerous. Cairns proposed that stem cells were smart carpenters, keeping and using the same DNA strands for making their many replicate copies over the human lifespan.

Prior to Asymmetrexs new report, published in a special issue of the peer-reviewed journal Symmetry, there were many publications on the presence of immortal DNA strands in stem cells of other species, including molds, plants, insects, and mice. Low levels of immortal DNA strands were also reported for human cancer cells.

The new report from Asymmetrex describes the presence of immortal DNA strands in human liver stem cells. The SACK-Xs 12(3) stem cells used in the study were developed more than a decade earlier using Asymmetrexs patented SACK tissue stem cell expansion technology. SACK-Xs 12(3) human liver stem cells are distributed for research by Kerafast. They are the first and only commercial human tissue stem cell product supplied with their stem cell-specific dosage, certified by Asymmetrex.

The new report brings an important closure for an ingenious scientific deduction by a remarkable scientist, John Cairns, recently deceased. Now that normal human tissue stem cells are confirmed to have immortal DNA strands, scientists can get on with the business of leveraging this knowledge to a better understanding of tissue stem cells for improving human health.

About Asymmetrex

Asymmetrex, LLC is a Massachusetts life sciences company with a focus on developing technologies to advance stem cell medicine. The companys U.S. and U.K. patent portfolio contains biotechnologies that solve the two main technical problems production and quantification that have stood in the way of effective use of human adult tissue stem cells for regenerative medicine and drug development. Asymmetrex markets the first technology for determination of the dose and quality of tissue stem cell preparations for use in stem cell transplantation therapies and pre-clinical drug evaluations. Asymmetrex is a member company of the Advanced Regenerative Manufacturing Institute BioFabUSA and the Massachusetts Biotechnology Council.

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Asymmetrex Publishes the First Report of Immortal DNA Strands in Human Stem Cells - PR Web

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