Stem Cell Therapy Market by Type, Therapeutic Application and Cell Source – Global Forecasts to 2026 – ResearchAndMarkets.com – Business Wire

DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The "Global Stem Cell Therapy Market by Type (Allogeneic, Autologous), Therapeutic Application (Musculoskeletal, Wound & Injury, CVD, Autoimmune & Inflammatory), Cell Source (Adipose tissue, Bone Marrow, Placenta/Umbilical Cord) - Forecasts to 2026" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

The global stem cell therapy market is projected to reach USD 401 million by 2026 from USD 187 million in 2021, at a CAGR of 16.5% during the forecast period.

Growth in this market is majorly driven by the increasing investment in stem cell research and the rising number of GMP-certified stem cell manufacturing plants. However, factors such as ethical concerns and the high cost of stem cell research and manufacturing process likely to hinder the growth of this market.

The allogeneic stem cell therapy segment accounted for the highest growth rate in the stem cell therapy market, by type, during the forecast period

The stem cell therapy market is segmented into allogeneic and autologous stem cell therapy. Allogeneic stem therapy segment accounted for the largest share of the stem cell therapy market. The large share of this segment can be attributed to the lesser complexities involved in manufacturing allogeneic-based therapies.

This segment is also expected to grow at the highest growth rate due to the increasing number of clinical trials in manufacturing allogeneic-based products.

Bone Marrow-derived MSCs segment accounted for the highest CAGR

Based on the cell source from which stem cells are obtained, the global stem cell therapy market is segmented into four sources. These include adipose tissue-derived MSCs (mesenchymal stem cells), bone marrow-derived MSCs, placenta/umbilical cord-derived MSCs, and other cell sources (which include human corneal epithelium stem cells, peripheral arterial-derived stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cell lines).

The bone marrow-derived MSCs segment is expected to witness the highest growth rate during the forecast period, owing to an increasing number of clinical trials focused on bone marrow-derived cell therapies and the rising demand for these cells in blood-related disorders.

Asia Pacific: The fastest-growing country in the stem cell therapy market

The stem cell therapy market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, RoW. The stem cell therapy market in the Asia Pacific region is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period.

Factors such as the growing adoption of stem cell-based treatment in the region and the growing approval & commercialization of stem cell-based products for degenerative disorders drive the growth of the stem cell therapy market in the region.

Market Dynamics

Drivers

Restraints

Opportunities

Challenges

Companies Mentioned

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/qiagh1

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FDA Approves Orgenesis IDE for Pilot Clinical Trial of its Tissue Genesis Icellator2(R) to Treat ARDS Resulting from COVID-19 Infection -…

FDA Approves Orgenesis IDE for Pilot Clinical Trial of its Tissue Genesis Icellator2(R) to Treat ARDS Resulting from COVID-19 Infection

IDE approval provides important validation of clinical development plans for the Icellator2

Germantown, Md., US, May 7, 2021 -Orgenesis Inc. (NASDAQ: ORGS)(Orgenesis or the Company), a global biotech company working to unlock the full potential of celland gene therapies, announces it has been granted Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to conduct a first-in-human feasibility study of the Tissue Genesis Icellator2(R) to treat Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) resulting from COVID-19 infection.

The Tissue Genesis Icellator2is a point-of-care cell isolation device that rapidly recovers high yields of stromal and vascular cells (SVF) from adipose tissue (fat) to be used therapeutically. The SVF derived from the Icellator2contains a population of mesenchymal stem cells, vascular endothelial cells, and immune cells which migrate to the patients lungs and other peripheral sites of inflammation. Published nonclinical and clinical evidence indicate that SVF from the Icellator2may potentially: (1) stabilize microcirculation to improve oxygenation; (2) maintain T and B lymphocytes to support antibody production; and (3) induce an anti-inflammatory effect. Orgenesis believes the multiple mechanisms of action of the SVF derived from the Icellator2are important to treat ARDS and other inflammatory disorders.

The FDA IDE approval covers 21 patients at one clinical site in the United States. This is the first trial approved by the FDA for intravenous administration of the SVF produced by the Icellator2.

The rates of hospitalized patients in the U.S. suffering from ARDS resulting from COVID-19 has declined significantly in recent months. Orgenesis will monitor and evaluate current clinical needs prior to initiating this approved pilot trial. Orgenesis may consider amending its clinical development plan to target treatment of non-COVID-19 related ARDS or treatment of patients who have not recovered from prior COVID-19 infections (so called long haulers).

Matthew Lehman, U.S. POCare General Manager, stated, We believe that the FDAs IDE authorization of the Tissue Genesis Icellator2clinical trial is a significant milestone for the Company. We are excited to move forward with clinical development of the Icellator to treat ARDS, COVID-19-related complications, and other serious conditions. Our interactions with the FDA through the IDE process will inform our development plans. We look forward to providing further updates on the progress of our Icellator2clinical trial.

About Orgenesis

Orgenesis is a global biotech company working to unlock the full potential of celland gene therapies (CGTs) in an affordable and accessible format at the point of care. The Orgenesis POCarePlatform is comprised of three enabling components: a pipeline of licensedPOCare Therapeuticsthat are processed and produced in closed, automatedPOCare Technologysystems across a collaborativePOCare Network. Orgenesisidentifies promising new therapies and leverages its POCare Platform to provide a rapid, globally harmonized pathway for these therapies to reach and treat large numbers of patients at lowered costs through efficient, scalable, and decentralized production. The POCare Network brings together patients, doctors, industry partners, research institutes and hospitals worldwide to achieve harmonized, regulated clinical development and production of the therapies. Learn more about the work Orgenesis is doing atwww.orgenesis.com.

Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements which are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These forward-looking statements involve substantial uncertainties and risks and are based upon our current expectations, estimates and projections and reflect our beliefs and assumptions based upon information available to us at the date of this release. We caution readers that forward-looking statements are predictions based on our current expectations about future events. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Our actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors, including, but not limited to, our reliance on, and our ability to grow, our point-of-care cell therapy platform, our ability to achieve and maintain overall profitability, our ability to manage our research and development programs that are based on novel technologies, our ability to control key elements relating to the development and commercialization of therapeutic product candidates with third parties, the timing of completion of clinical trials and studies, the availability of additional data, outcomes of clinical trials of our product candidates, the potential uses and benefits of our product candidates, our ability to manage potential disruptions as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, the sufficiency of working capital to realize our business plans, the development of our POCare strategy, our trans differentiation technology as therapeutic treatment for diabetes, the technology behind our in-licensed ATMPs not functioning as expected, our ability to further our CGT development projects, either directly or through our JV partner agreements, and to fulfill our obligations under such agreements, our license agreements with other institutions, our ability to retain key employees, our competitors developing better or cheaper alternatives to our products and the risks and uncertainties discussed under the heading "RISK FACTORS" in Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, and in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We undertake no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statement for any reason.

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FDA Approves Orgenesis IDE for Pilot Clinical Trial of its Tissue Genesis Icellator2(R) to Treat ARDS Resulting from COVID-19 Infection -...

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Plasma Cell Proliferation Is Reduced in Myeloma-Induced Hypercalcemia and in Co-Culture with Normal Healthy BM-MSCs – DocWire News

This article was originally published here

Lab Med. 2021 May 4;52(3):273-289. doi: 10.1093/labmed/lmaa060.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In multiple myeloma (MM), stimulation of osteoclasts and bone marrow (BM) lesions lead to hypercalcemia, renal failure, and anemia. Co-culture of the myeloma cells in both hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia concentrations with bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Viability and survival of myeloma cells were assessed by microculture tetrazolium test and flow cytometric assays. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were extracted from normal and myeloma patients and were co-cultured with myeloma cells.

RESULTS: Myeloma cells showed less survival in both hypocalcaemia and hypercalcemia conditions (P <.01). The paracrine and juxtacrine conditions of demineralized bone matrix-induced hypercalcemia increased the proliferation and survival of the cells (P <.05). Unlike myeloma MSCs, normal MSCs reduced the survival of and induced apoptosis in myeloma cells (P <.1).

CONCLUSION: Normal healthy-MSCs do not protect myeloma cells, but inhibit them. However, increasing the ratio of myeloma cells to MSCs reduces their inhibitory effects of MSCs and leads to their myelomatous transformation.

PMID:33942854 | DOI:10.1093/labmed/lmaa060

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Plasma Cell Proliferation Is Reduced in Myeloma-Induced Hypercalcemia and in Co-Culture with Normal Healthy BM-MSCs - DocWire News

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Postdoctoral Researcher in the Stem Cell Biology job with DUBLIN CITY UNIVERSITY | 253351 – Times Higher Education (THE)

Research Centre:The Vascular Biology & Therapeutics Group, School of BiotechnologyLevel on Framework:Level 1Post Duration:12 months

Overview:

Dublin City University http://www.DCU.ie is a young, ambitious and vibrant University, with a mission to transform lives and societies through education, research, innovation and engagement. Known as Irelands University of Enterprise and Transformation, it is committed to the development of talent, and the discovery and translation of knowledge that advances society and the economy. DCU is the Sunday Times Irish University of the Year 2021.

The University is based on three academic campuses in the Glasnevin-Drumcondra region of north Dublin. It currently has more than 18,000 students enrolled across five faculties Science and Health, DCU Business School, Computing and Engineering, Humanities and Social Sciences and DCU Institute of Education. DCU is committed to excellence across all its activities. This is demonstrated by its world-class research initiatives, its cutting-edge approach to teaching and learning, its focus on creating a transformative student experience, and its positive social and economic impact. This exceptional commitment on the part of its staff and students has led to DCUs ranking among the top 2% of universities globally. It also consistently features in the worlds Top 100 Young Universities (currently in QS Top 70 Under 50, Times Higher Top 150 Under 100).

DCU is placed 84th in the world, in the Times Higher Education University Impact Rankings measuring higher education institutions contributions towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Over the past decade, DCU has also been the leading Irish university in the area of technology transfer, as reflected by licensing of intellectual property.

Background and Role:

The EVPRO project (Extracellular Vesicles Promoted Regenerative Osseointegration) aims to counteract the shortened lifetime and to reduce the risk of inflammation of hip revision prostheses. To this end, we are developing a novel bioinspired adaptive coating for hip revision endoprosthesis, which is able to control inflammation at the original anatomical location of the removed endoprosthesis and promote bone regeneration. We seek to achieve this by safe integration of human mesenchymal stem cell derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) into a smart biodegradable hydrogel which is absorbed into the micro pores of a TiO2 coating on the surface of conventional titan endoprosthesis.

An EU funded post-doctoral position in cell and molecular biology is available to join the Vascular Biology and Therapeutics Group in the School of Biotechnology. The successful candidate will join the team to generate and characterise human mesenchymal stromal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) from cells grown in long-term cultures using hollow-fibre bioreactors (HFBRs).

Research Career Framework:

As part of this role the researcher will be required to participate in the DCU Research Career Framework (http://dcu.ie/hr/ResearchersFramework/index.shtml). This framework is designed to provide significant professional development opportunities to researchers and offer the best opportunities in terms of a wider career path.

DCU has a strong track record in attracting both Irish and European Union research funding under Horizon 2020 (and all previous Framework programmes), Marie Curie Actions and Erasmus. We offer a dynamic and internationally-focused environment in which you can advance your academic career.

Principle Duties and Responsibilities:

Minimum Criteria:

Candidates will be assessed on the following competencies:

Discipline knowledge and Research skills Demonstrates knowledge of a research discipline and the ability to conduct a specific programme of research within that discipline

Understanding the Research Environment Demonstrates an awareness of the research environment (for example funding bodies) and the ability to contribute to grant applications

Communicating Research Demonstrates the ability to communicate their research with their peers and the wider research community (for example presenting at conferences and publishing research in relevant journals) and the potential to teach and tutor students

Managing & Leadership skills - Demonstrates the potential to manage a research project including the supervision of undergraduate students

Mandatory Training:

The post holder will be required to undertake the following mandatory compliance training: Orientation, Health and Safety and Intellectual Property and Data Protection training. Other training may need to be undertaken when required.

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Postdoctoral Researcher in the Stem Cell Biology job with DUBLIN CITY UNIVERSITY | 253351 - Times Higher Education (THE)

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FDA Approves Orgenesis IDE for Pilot Clinical Trial of its Tissue Genesis Icellator2 to Treat ARDS Resulting from COVID-19 Infection – Yahoo Finance

IDE approval provides important validation of clinical development plans for the Icellator2

GERMANTOWN, Md., May 06, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Orgenesis Inc. (NASDAQ: ORGS) (Orgenesis or the Company), a global biotech company working to unlock the full potential of cell and gene therapies, announces it has been granted Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to conduct a first-in-human feasibility study of the Tissue Genesis Icellator2 to treat Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) resulting from COVID-19 infection.

The Tissue Genesis Icellator2 is a point-of-care cell isolation device that rapidly recovers high yields of stromal and vascular cells (SVF) from adipose tissue (fat) to be used therapeutically. The SVF derived from the Icellator2 contains a population of mesenchymal stem cells, vascular endothelial cells, and immune cells which migrate to the patients lungs and other peripheral sites of inflammation. Published nonclinical and clinical evidence indicate that SVF from the Icellator2 may potentially: (1) stabilize microcirculation to improve oxygenation; (2) maintain T and B lymphocytes to support antibody production; and (3) induce an anti-inflammatory effect. Orgenesis believes the multiple mechanisms of action of the SVF derived from the Icellator2 are important to treat ARDS and other inflammatory disorders.

The FDA IDE approval covers 21 patients at one clinical site in the United States. This is the first trial approved by the FDA for intravenous administration of the SVF produced by the Icellator2.

The rates of hospitalized patients in the U.S. suffering from ARDS resulting from COVID-19 has declined significantly in recent months. Orgenesis will monitor and evaluate current clinical needs prior to initiating this approved pilot trial. Orgenesis may consider amending its clinical development plan to target treatment of non-COVID-19 related ARDS or treatment of patients who have not recovered from prior COVID-19 infections (so called long haulers).

Story continues

Matthew Lehman, U.S. POCare General Manager, stated, We believe that the FDAs IDE authorization of the Tissue Genesis Icellator2 clinical trial is a significant milestone for the Company. We are excited to move forward with clinical development of the Icellator to treat ARDS, COVID-19-related complications, and other serious conditions. Our interactions with the FDA through the IDE process will inform our development plans. We look forward to providing further updates on the progress of our Icellator2 clinical trial.

About OrgenesisOrgenesis is a global biotech company working to unlock the full potential of cell and gene therapies (CGTs) in an affordable and accessible format at the point of care. The Orgenesis POCare Platform is comprised of three enabling components: a pipeline of licensed POCare Therapeutics that are processed and produced in closed, automated POCare Technology systems across a collaborative POCare Network. Orgenesis identifies promising new therapies and leverages its POCare Platform to provide a rapid, globally harmonized pathway for these therapies to reach and treat large numbers of patients at lowered costs through efficient, scalable, and decentralized production. The POCare Network brings together patients, doctors, industry partners, research institutes and hospitals worldwide to achieve harmonized, regulated clinical development and production of the therapies. Learn more about the work Orgenesis is doing at http://www.orgenesis.com.

Notice Regarding Forward-Looking StatementsThis press release contains forward-looking statements which are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These forward-looking statements involve substantial uncertainties and risks and are based upon our current expectations, estimates and projections and reflect our beliefs and assumptions based upon information available to us at the date of this release. We caution readers that forward-looking statements are predictions based on our current expectations about future events. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Our actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors, including, but not limited to, our reliance on, and our ability to grow, our point-of-care cell therapy platform, our ability to achieve and maintain overall profitability, our ability to manage our research and development programs that are based on novel technologies, our ability to control key elements relating to the development and commercialization of therapeutic product candidates with third parties, the timing of completion of clinical trials and studies, the availability of additional data, outcomes of clinical trials of our product candidates, the potential uses and benefits of our product candidates, our ability to manage potential disruptions as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, the sufficiency of working capital to realize our business plans, the development of our POCare strategy, our trans differentiation technology as therapeutic treatment for diabetes, the technology behind our in-licensed ATMPs not functioning as expected, our ability to further our CGT development projects, either directly or through our JV partner agreements, and to fulfill our obligations under such agreements, our license agreements with other institutions, our ability to retain key employees, our competitors developing better or cheaper alternatives to our products and the risks and uncertainties discussed under the heading "RISK FACTORS" in Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, and in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We undertake no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statement for any reason.

Contact for Orgenesis:Crescendo Communications, LLCTel: 212-671-1021Orgs@crescendo-ir.com

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FDA Approves Orgenesis IDE for Pilot Clinical Trial of its Tissue Genesis Icellator2 to Treat ARDS Resulting from COVID-19 Infection - Yahoo Finance

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Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw | IJN – Dove Medical Press

Introduction

Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis, multiple myeloma, breast cancers, and bone metastasis of cancer. Since first being reported by Marx in 2003,1 bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ), a severe side effect of bisphosphonates, has been a growing concern for oral and maxillofacial surgeons.2 BRONJ is defined as follows: 1) exposed bone in the maxillofacial region for longer than 8 weeks; 2) current or previous treatment with bisphosphonates; 3) no history of radiation therapy to the jaws or obvious metastatic disease to the jaws.3 Exposed necrotic bone in the oral cavity is a typical clinical manifestation of BRONJ, always accompanied by jaw pain and local soft swelling, leading to a marked decrease in patients life quality. Although BRONJ has been studied over decades, the pathophysiology of the disease has not been fully elucidated. Several hypotheses try to explain its pathophysiology, such as disturbed bone remodeling, angiogenesis inhibition, inflammation and infection, soft tissue toxicity, immune dysfunction.4 The proper treatments of BRONJ are still under debate, and the efficacy is quite limited.5,6

Adipose tissue, an energy storage depot, has been considered as a multifunctional organ that controls metabolic homeostasis, immunity, and satiety due to recent studies.7,8 Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)9,10 and stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells11 of adipose tissue have been proved efficient at preventing BRONJ. However, cellular therapies may also be accompanied by some side effects, such as thromboembolism, pro-tumorigenic, and undesired immune response.12,13 In addition, growing evidence has strongly indicated that most of the therapeutic efficacy of adipose tissue components is related to their paracrine activities.14 Small extracellular vesicles (sEV), which are lipid bilayer particles released from cells that consist of proteins, lipids, and RNA, play an essential role in inter-cellular communication.15 All cell types of adipose tissue, such as adipocytes, endothelial, immune cells and fibroblasts, contribute to the composition of small extracellular vesicles derived from adipose tissue (sEV-AT). Our previous studies suggest that sEV-AT can promote proliferation, migration, and angiogenic potential of endothelial cells and contribute to soft tissue regeneration.16,17 However, the therapy potential of sEV-AT requires further study.

We hypothesized that sEV-AT transplantation could prevent the development of BRONJ by promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sEV-AT injection on tooth extraction socket healing in a rat BRONJ model.

Animals were obtained from Dashuo Experimental Animal Co. Ltd. (Chengdu, China). This study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committees of the State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University. The approval number is WCHSIRB-D-2021-028. The care and use of the laboratory animals followed the guidelines of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University.

sEV-AT were prepared as previously described.16,17 Fat pads were isolated from 4-week-old SD rats. Minced fat pieces were cultured with Serum-free -modified Eagles medium (-MEM, HyClone, Utah, USA) in a Celstir spinner flask (Wheaton, USA) at 100 rpm, 37C, in 5% CO2 for 48 h. After removing tissue pieces by gauze and cellular debris by centrifugation (2000 g, 4C, 20 min), the supernatant was filtered through a 40 m filter (Corning, NY, USA) to get adipose tissue extract (ATE). ATE was filtered through 0.22 m filters (Millipore, Cork, Ireland), then concentrated by Ultracel-3 membrane (Millipore, Cork, Ireland) at 5000 g, 4C for 30 min, followed by further concentration by Ultracel-100 membrane (Millipore, Cork, Ireland) at 5000 g, 4C for 30 min. The concentrated ATE was mixed with the Total Exosome Isolation TM reagent (Invitrogen, Vilnius, Lithuania) at 4C overnight and spun down at 10,000 g, 4C for 1 h to obtain sEV-AT. sEV-AT were measured in terms of total protein amount determined by the bicinchoninic protein assay method according to the manufacturers protocol (BCA Protein Assay Kit, KeyGEN BioTECH, Nanjing, China).

The isolated sEV-AT were visualized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM, Tecnai G2 F20 S-TWIN, FEI, Oregon, USA) by negative staining. The particle size and size distribution of sEV-AT were determined by ZetaVIEW S/N 19480 analysis system (Software ZetaView version 8.05.11, Particle Metrix, Meerbusch, Germany) according to the manufacturers protocol. The protein markers (CD63, CD9, HSP70 and actin) were detected by Western blotting. sEV-AT were labeled with membrane-labeling dye DiO (Invitrogen) in serum-free -MEM at 37C for 20 min. Then, DiO-labeled sEV-AT were re-purified with the Total Exosome Isolation TM reagent. HUVECs were co-cultured with DiO-labeled sEV-AT for 6 hours, washed with PBS, fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, stained with phalloidin (Invitrogen) and DAPI, washed with PBS and imaged by confocal microscopy (FV1000, Olympus, Tokyo, Japan).

sEV-AT were mixed with DiR (PerkinElmer, USA) dye in serum-free -MEM at 37C for 20 min. Then, DiR-labeled sEV-AT were re-purified with the Total Exosome Isolation TM reagent. DiR-labeled sEV-AT were injected into SD rats tail vein immediately after the maxillary left the first molar extraction. DiR fluorescence was analyzed using the Maestro EX pro in vivo imaging system (PerkinElmer, USA) at 1, 12, 24 hours post-injection. DiR fluorescence in brain, maxilla, lung, heart, liver, spleen and kidney was also measured.

Thirty-five 8-week-old female SD rats (20010 g) were used in this study. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: 1) Control (n=7); 2) Zol+Dex (n=14); 3) sEV-AT (n=14). To create a rat BRONJ model, both Zol (66 g/kg, Chiataitianqing Pharma, Jiangsu, China) and Dex (5 mg/kg, Quanyu Pharma, Shanghai, China) were subcutaneously administered three times per week for 4 weeks according to previous reports.18 Two weeks after the first administration, the maxillary left first molars were extracted with general and local anesthesia. sEV-AT (1 g/kg) were injected into the tail vein every three days after tooth extraction in the sEV-AT group. Equal volume of saline was injected in the Zol+Dex group. Untreated rats were euthanized at 2 weeks post-extraction as natural healing control. Rats were euthanized at 2 weeks (n=7 each group) and 4 weeks (n=7 each group) post-extraction in the other two groups.

Occlusal view images of tooth extraction sockets were taken after euthanasia with stereo microscope (SZX2-ILLT, Olympus, Tokyo, Japan). Borderlines between epithelium and exposed bone were digitally drawn using NIH ImageJ (https://imagej.nih.gov/ij/). The area surrounded by the borderline was defined as a wound open area.

Left maxillae were dissected, fixed with 4% of paraformaldehyde and scanned by CT 50 (SCANCO Medical AG, Zurich, Switzerland) using a voxel resolution and an energy level of 10 m and 70 kV, respectively. Three-dimensional (3D) images were reconstituted using software SCANCO Visualizer 1.1.18.0. Bone morphometric analysis of the extraction sockets was performed using the software SCANCO Evaluation 1.1.19.0. For bone morphometric analysis, Bone volume/Total volume (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) were measured.

After radiological assessment, the samples were decalcified with 10% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) at 4C for 2 weeks. Demineralized maxillae were paraffin-embedded and sectioned at a thickness of 6m. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE, Solarbio, Beijing, China) staining was carried out. Bone portion which equals to or is greater than 10 adjacent empty osteocyte lacunae is defined as necrotic bone.19 Empty osteocyte lacunae were counted in tooth extraction sockets and expressed as a percentage of total bone lacunae (%). Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, Fujifilm, Osaka, Japan) staining was carried out to detect TRAP positive cells per linear bone perimeter (#/mm). Massons trichrome (Baso, Zhuhai, China) staining was performed to evaluate collagen fibers. The content of VEGFA was detected by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. After deparaffinization, hydration and blockage of endogenous peroxidase, the sections were incubated for 1 h with normal goat serum in order to block specific sites and then incubated overnight at 4C with primary anti-VEGFA antibody (Abcam, ab46154, USA). The secondary antibody was shown by the DAB kit (Gene Tech, Shanghai, China). The images were analyzed using NIH ImageJ.

Human umbilical cords were obtained from the Department of Obstetrics of the West China Second University Hospital of Sichuan University. The approval number is WCHSIRB-D-2021-015. We obtained the signed informed consent from the parents, in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. HUVECs were isolated from the umbilical vein as previously reported with some modification.20 First, the collected umbilical cords were rinsed twice with phosphate-buffered saline. Then, the umbilical vein was filled with 0.2% collagenase and incubated for 30 min in a humidified atmosphere of 37C and 5% CO2 for isolation of HUVECs. After that, the cells were collected and cultured in 25 cm2 tissue culture asks (Corning) with ECM (ScienCell, California, USA).

HUVECs were seeded onto 96-well plates (NEST, Jiangsu, China) at 500 cells per well. After 24 h, the culture medium was replaced with ECM (100 L) containing 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 uM Zol (Sigma-Aldrich, USA) respectively. The cell number was evaluated using the cell-counting kit-8 (CCK8, KeyGEN BioTECH, Nanjing, China) according to the manufacturers instructions. Growth curves were drawn with the absorbance values (n = 5). Then, HUVECs were divided into three groups: (1) Control: HUVECs cultured with ECM, (2) Zol: HUVECs cultured with ECM and Zol, (3) sEV-AT: HUVECs cultured with ECM, Zol and sEV-AT (50g/mL). Growth curves were drawn for each group using the same method.

HUVECs (8x103), suspended with 50 L medium as the group division described above, were seeded onto angiogenesis u-slide (Ibidi, Grfelfing, Germany) coated with Matrigel (10 ul, Corning, USA). After incubation for 4 h, phase-contrast images were captured by an inverted microscope (Olympus, TH4-200, Tokyo, Japan). Total length and total nodes were measured using angiogenesis analyzer of ImageJ.

Cell migration was measured using a 6.5 mm Transwell with 8.0 m Pore Polycarbonate Membrane Insert (Corning, USA). In the upper chamber, HUVECs were added at a density of 2104 cells per well. In the lower chamber, 600 L medium as the group division described above were added and then incubated for 18 h. Cells that migrated to the lower surface of the membrane were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde and stained with crystal violet staining solution (Solarbio, Beijing, China). The number of migrated cells was counted in three randomly selected microscopic fields. All in vitro experiments were carried out with three independent replications.

Results are expressed as mean value-standard deviation. An unpaired 2-tailed Students t test was applied when comparing 2 groups. To analyze 3 or more independent groups, we used a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Tukeys post hoc test. If the two-tailed P value was <0.05 (*), <0.01 (**), <0.001 (***), it can be considered that the data were significantly different.

sEV were isolated from rat adipose tissue using a kit-based ultrafiltration method we have previously reported.16,17 Transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed that sEV-AT were round-shaped vesicles surrounded by a bilayer membrane (Figure 1A). Nanoparticle tracking analysis by ZataView confirmed the size and its distribution. The sEV-AT had various sizes with a peak at 122nm (Figure 1B). Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of exosomal protein markers (CD9, CD63, and HSP70) in sEV-AT. And the cellular protein actin was not detected on the contrary (Figure 1C). Furthermore, we confirmed that the sEV-AT labeled with DiO were taken into the cell cytoplasm of HUVECs when cultured together (Figure 1D).

Figure 1 Characterization of sEV-AT. (A) Representative images of sEV-AT with transmission electron microscopy. Scale bar=100 nm. (B) The particle size distribution of sEV-AT was measured by ZataView analysis. (C) Western blot analysis of exosomal markers, CD63, CD9, and HSP70. Actin was cellular protein as a control. (D) Uptake analysis of sEV-AT by HUVECs (red: phalloidin, green: DiO-labeled sEV-AT, blue: nuclei). Scale bar=20 m.

Abbreviations: sEV-AT, small extracellular vesicles derived from adipose tissue. HSP70, heat shock protein 70. HUVECs, human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

Non-invasive in vivo imaging showed that DiR-labeled sEV-AT predominantly accumulated in the liver at 1 h post-injection. At 12 h and 24 h post-injection, a clear distribution profile of liver and spleen was detected (Supplementary Figure S1A). Furthermore, we performed ex vivo imaging of major organs to find the complete biodistribution pattern of EVs-AT (Supplementary Figure S1B). The signals from the maxilla were also successfully detected at 12 h post-injection, which was mainly concentrated in the tooth extraction socket. At 24 h post-injection, the intensity of signals increased, and the range of signals was wider (Figure 2).

Figure 2 Biodistribution of DiR-labeled sEV-AT to maxilla. Ex vivo images of maxillae from rats after intravenous injection of DiR-labeled sEV-AT.

Abbreviation: sEV-AT, small extracellular vesicles derived from adipose tissue.

Zol, Dex and sEV-AT were injected according to the schedule (Figure 3A). Two weeks after tooth extraction, the Zol+Dex group and sEV-AT group showed exposed bone without soft tissue coverage, whereas extraction sockets were healed in the control group (Figure 3B). However, sEV-AT therapy significantly decreased the wound open area (p<0.001) (Figure 3C). Four weeks after tooth extraction, wound open area with exposed bone was observed in the Zol+Dex group, which confirming the establishment of rat BRONJ model. In contrast, the sEV-AT group showed wound healing in most cases (5/7) (Figure 3B and C).

Figure 3 Effects of sEV-AT injection on rat BRONJ model. (A) Development of rat BRONJ model and schedule of sEV-AT injection (Control: natural healing group; Zol+Dex: Zol+Dex and saline treated group; sEV-AT: Zol+Dex and sEV-AT treated group). (B) Representative intraoral photos. Scale bar=1mm. (C) Open area without epithelium coverage. Open area was significantly decreased by sEV-AT treatment (***p<0.001). (D) Representative CT images of tooth extraction sockets (red dotted lines: tooth extraction sockets). Scale bar=1mm. (E) Quantification of BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th and Tb.Sp in each group (***p<0.001).

Abbreviations: sEV-AT, small extracellular vesicles derived from adipose tissue. BRONJ, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. CT, microcomputed tomography. BV/TV, bone volume/total volume. Tb.N, trabecular number. Tb.Th, trabecular thickness. Tb.Sp, trabecular separation. Zol, zoledronate. Dex, dexamethasone.

CT analysis showed that extraction sockets were filled with newly formed bones in the control group. On the contrary, extraction sockets were almost empty in the Zol+Dex group. Bone volume in extraction sockets appeared to be larger in the sEV-AT group than the Zol+Dex group (Figure 3D). Bone morphometric analysis showed that sEV-AT treatment significantly increased BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, and decreased Tb.Sp (p<0.001) (Figure 3E).

Histological analysis was performed to further investigate how sEV-AT work on wound healing in tooth extraction sockets. Zol+Dex treatment led to necrotic bones and empty osteocyte lacunae. Necrotic bones in the sEV-AT group were less and smaller than the Zol+Dex group (Figure 4A). Furthermore, the percentage of empty osteocyte lacunae was reduced with the administration of sEV-AT (p<0.001) (Figure 4B). TRAP staining showed that the average number of osteoclasts per linear bone perimeter was significantly reduced in the Zol+Dex group compared to the control group (p<0.001). However, sEV-AT signicantly increased the average number of osteoclasts (p<0.001) (Figure 4C and D). Massons trichrome staining showed that sEV-AT significantly increased the production of collagen fibers (p<0.001) (Figure 4E and F). Immunohistochemical staining showed that Zol+Dex treatment reduced the number of blood vessels, whereas sEV-AT therapy led to an appreciable increase in the number of blood vessels (p<0.001) (Figure 4G and H).

Figure 4 Histological analysis of tooth extraction sockets in each group (Control: natural healing group; Zol+Dex: Zol+Dex and saline treated group; sEV-AT: Zol+Dex and sEV-AT treated group). (A) Representative HE-stained images of tooth extraction sockets (black dotted line: tooth extraction sockets, red dotted line: necrotic bones, black square: areas were magnified). Scale bar=1mm (upper), scale bar=100 m (lower). (B) The percentage of empty osteocyte lacunae (***p < 0.001). (C) Representative TRAP-stained images of tooth extraction sockets (white arrowhead: TRAP positive cells). Scale bar=50 m. (D) The number of TRAP positive cells per linear bone perimeter (***p < 0.001). (E) Representative massons trichrome-stained images of tooth extraction sockets (black dotted line: tooth extraction sockets of mesial roots). Scale bar=500 m. (F) The area percentage of collagen fibers (***p < 0.001). (G) Representative anti-VEGFA immunohistochemical images of tooth extraction sockets (white arrowhead: VEGFA positive blood vessels). Scale bar=100 m. (H) The number of VEGFA positive blood vessels (***p < 0.001).

Abbreviations: HE, hematoxylin and eosin. sEV-AT, small extracellular vesicles derived from adipose tissue. Zol, zoledronate. Dex, dexamethasone. TRAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. VEGFA, vascular endothelial growth factor A.

To explore the effects of Zol on cell proliferation, 5 M, 10 M, 15 M, 20 M Zol were treated with HUVECs. The results showed that Zol obviously inhibited the proliferation of HUVECs, and the higher the concentration was, the stronger the inhibitive effect was (Figure 5A). Based on the results, 10M, the lowest concentration that had a statistically negative effect on HUVECs proliferation, was chosen for the rest of the study. The results of CCK8 showed that sEV-AT could reverse the inhibiting effect of Zol on HUVECs proliferation (Figure 5B). Tube formation assay showed that Zol inhibited the formation of tube-like structures. The total length and total nodes of HUVECs were reduced after Zol stimulating (p<0.01). However, sEV-AT could promote the tube formation of HUVECs in the Zol-stimulated environment, represented as the increasing of the total length (p<0.05) and total nodes (p<0.01) (Figure 5C). Transwell migration assay showed that Zol inhibited the migration of HUVECs (p<0.01). sEV-AT promoted the migration of HUVECs in the Zol-stimulated environment (p<0.05) (Figure 5D).

Figure 5 Effects of sEV-AT and Zol on HUVECs. (A) Effects of Zol at different concentration on HUVECs proliferation (***p < 0.001). (B) Proliferation curves of HUVECs in each group (Control: ECM; Zol: ECM+Zol; sEV-AT: ECM+Zol+sEV-AT) (**p<0.01, ***p<0.001). (C) Representative tube-like structures of HUVECs in each group. Scale bar=200 m (upper), scale bar=500m (lower). Total length and total nodes of all tubing per field of view from three individual experiments (ns: P>0.05, *p<0.05, **p<0.01). (D) Representative microscope images of migrated HUVECs in each group. Scale bar=100m. Migrated cells per field of view from three individual experiments (*p<0.05, **p<0.01).

Abbreviations: sEV-AT, small extracellular vesicles derived from adipose tissue. HUVECs, human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Zol, zoledronate. ECM, endothelial cell medium.

The risk of BRONJ in patients who have received zoledronate is higher than those treated with other bisphosphonates.21,22 The risk of BRONJ is increased by multiple immunosuppressive drugs, such as corticosteroids and chemotherapeutic agents, which are frequently used in cancer therapy.23,24 In addition, tooth extraction has been proved to be a major local risk factor for BRONJ.25 According to these clinical research findings, BRONJ-like animal models were built via combining the administration of zoledronate and dexamethasone, along with tooth extraction.18,26,27 In our study, we built the BRONJ rat model using the method reported by Kaibuchi N,18 which stated that BRONJ-like lesions were observed in all cases. The method was proved to be efficient that all rats in the Zol+Dex group have developed BRONJ-like lesions. The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons defines BRONJ as exposed bone or bone that can be probed through an intraoral or extraoral fistula in the maxillofacial region which has persisted for longer than 8 weeks.3 However, extraction sockets in human normally takes 23 months to heal, while the healing of rats takes much shorter. In our study, we found that all extraction sockets were covered with epithelium completely and filled with newly formed bone in untreated rats within two weeks post tooth extraction. Thus, samples of untreated rats were collected two weeks after tooth extraction as healing control. Considering that healing of extraction sockets takes shorter time in rats than in human, the samples of the Zol+Dex group and the sEV-AT group were collected at 2, 4 weeks post tooth extraction for analysis.

Cell-based therapies have been proved efficiently to prevent BRONJ in several studies.911,18,28,29 sEV have similar therapeutic effects as their parent cells. Increasing evidence showed that sEV have significant advantages over cell therapy, including easier storage, less risks of malignant transformation, and increasing stability.14,30,31 sEV-based therapies are promising alternatives to cell-based therapies. A recent study stated that extracellular vesicles released from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-EVs) could prevent BRONJ.32 However, MSC-EVs require much work to be extracted after mass cultivation of MSC. Direct isolation of sEV from adipose tissue, an easily accessible source of biological material, costs less time and money. And it results in higher yields compared to isolation of cell culture derived sEV. Lipoaspirate nanoparticles, consisting of extracellular vesicles and lipoproteins, were proved to have similar anti-inflammatory and protective functions as extracellular vesicles from ADSCs.33 Our previous study found the potential of sEV-AT on angiogenesis and soft tissue regeneration.16,17 Furthermore, 45 conserved miRNAs were enriched in sEV-AT compared to sEV derived from ADSCs according to our previous study. These miRNAs were reported to participate in various functions, such as adipogenesis, angiogenesis, or metabolism.34 Secretome derived from an intact adipose environment may function better compared to adipose tissue that had been digested, cultured and lacked certain cell types. In this study, we found that sEV-AT contributed to wound healing and tissue regeneration of tooth extraction sockets which were disturbed by Zol+Dex. To our knowledge, our findings are the first to show that systemic transplantation of sEV-AT could prevent the onset of BRONJ in rats that have received Zol+Dex treatment. Systemic transplantation of sEV-AT could be a potential prevention and treatment strategies for BRONJ.

Angiogenesis is essential for wound healing. Zol was reported to suppress the vascularization after tooth extraction.35 We observed that there were less blood vessels in the extraction sockets after Zol+Dex administration. In contrast, sEV-AT administration promoted new blood vessels formation. We further investigated the effects of Zol and sEV-AT on HUVECs. Zol inhibited the proliferation, migration and angiogenesis of HUVECs, which was consistent with previous reports.36 sEV-AT protected HUVECs from being inhibited by Zol. These results demonstrated that sEV-AT promoted angiogenesis, which contributed to the prevention of BRONJ. Zoledronate has been reported to impact angiogenesis by disturbing the expression of some important mRNAs and proteins.3638 Our previous study demonstrated that sEV-AT contained miRNAs, such as miR-150-3p, miR-126a-3p, which were associated with angiogenesis.34 We will further study on the molecular mechanism of how sEV-AT influence angiogenesis and prevent BRONJ.

However, our current study still has some limitations. The healing of extraction sockets in BRONJ is affected by many factors other than angiogenesis, such as bone marrow stromal cells, osteocytes, osteoclasts, collagen fiber formation.3943 In our study, we found that sEV-AT administration increased osteoclasts, collagen fibers, blood vessels, and reduced empty osteocyte lacunae. Yet the comprehensive effects of sEV-AT were not fully investigated. The effects of sEV-AT on altered micro-environment of maxillofacial bone induced by Zol require further study.

In this study, we successfully built a BRONJ rat model with Zol and Dex administration, combining tooth extraction. sEV-AT contributed to both osseous and soft tissue regeneration in the BRONJ rat model. sEV-AT promoted the proliferation, migration and angiogenesis of HUVECs inhibited by Zol, which is vital in extraction sockets healing.

In summary, sEV-AT, which are easily obtained, could be a promising biological product to prevent BRONJ.

All authors made substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; took part in drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content; agreed to submit to the current journal; gave final approval for the version to be published; and agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work.

This work was supported by grants from the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2017YFA0104800) and Key Project of Sichuan province (2019YFS0515).

The authors report no conflicts of interest in this work.

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UoH start-up claims breakthrough COVID-19 treatment through stem cells – The Hindu

A breakthrough human Umbilical Cord (UC) tissue harvested and clinically processed adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs)-based therapy to COVID patients has been announced by Transcell Oncologics, a biotech start-up company, incubated at ASPIRE-Technology Business Incubator (ASPIRE-TBI), University of Hyderabad (UoH) on Monday.

The firm had developed proprietary cell-based platform technology HEMATO UC-MSCs with anti-cytokine storm properties, anti-inflammatory attributes and repairing abilities. The research recommends HEMATO UC-MSCs to be administered as two intravenous infusions, at a dose of 100 million cells per infusion, given 72 hours apart to the COVID patients.

A significant decrease in a set of inflammatory cytokines involved in the COVID-19 cytokine storm; with significantly improved patient survival and time to recovery was observed following the treatment, claimed, an official spokesman in a press release.

MSCs have the proven ability to reduce ventilator-induced lung damage, reduce cytokine storm, regenerate damaged tissue encouraging practitioners to use them for pre-treating COVID patients in the hospital. HEMATO UC-MSCs fall in that category, per se they do not cause any adverse effects, are easy to administer, proven to be safe for human application, with added benefits like no damage caused to any organ, said founder-CEO Subadra Dravida.

She said the new method provides an alternative opportunity to the practitioners to treat increasing COVID-19 cases in the country. The advantage of the therapy is this new way of curing COVID patients in real time to save them and not to treat the symptoms alone. Also, if HEMATO UC-MSCs are administered as the first line of treatment followed by concomitant steps to alleviate the associated symptoms in a traditional way, COVID deaths can be dodged, she asserted.

Effectiveness of this MSC-based technology has been confirmed by Cell Transplant Centre, Miami Miller School of Medicine, Jackson Health System, Department of Public Health Sciences, USA on COVID-19 patients suffering from Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). It has released a detailed research paper on a randomised Controlled Trial (double blind pase 1/2a) and confirmed the laboratory findings from Transcell Oncologics.

The CEO said HEMATO UC-MSCs are already being used by multiple hospitals in Hyderabad and rest of Telangana to save COVID patients. Hospitals in other cities are also in the process of starting the treatments. It can be delivered pan India within 48 hours and has been specially treated for storage under 2-8 deg C refrigerated conditions for ease of use by the practitioners within 72 hours.

UoH Vice-Chancellor Appa Rao Podile expressed his happiness about the availability of an alternative treatment for the COVID-19 developed by UoH Startup Transcell Oncologics. Contact details for HEMATO UC-MSCs: Whatsapp or Regular phone: 91-8297256755 or 91-8886666615 or rgupta@tran-scell.com

Transcell Oncologics is into drug discovery, enabling cancer medicine and the related invitro testing applications as alternative models to animals in validating pharma, vaccine and cosmetics intended for human consumption. HEMATO Global, a product brand from Transcell Oncologics, has over 20 distinct products based on clinically processed stem cells in and as therapeutic tools for imparting transplantations and crystorage services for cancer treatments, said a press release.

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UoH start-up claims breakthrough COVID-19 treatment through stem cells - The Hindu

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Global Mesenchymal Stem Cells Market by Type (Human MSC, Mouse MSC, Rat MSC, Other), By Application (Research Institute, Hospital, Others) And By…

Industry Growth Insights published a new data on Mesenchymal Stem Cells Market. The research report is titled Mesenchymal Stem Cells Market research by Types (Human MSC, Mouse MSC, Rat MSC, Other), By Applications (Research Institute, Hospital, Others), By Players/Companies Lonza, Thermo Fisher, Bio-Techne, ATCC, MilliporeSigma, PromoCell GmbH, Genlantis, Celprogen, Cell Applications, Cyagen Biosciences, Axol Bioscience. As per the latest research Mesenchymal Stem Cells market is expected to expand at a CAGR of xx% in the forecast period.

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Report Attributes

Report Details

Report Title

Mesenchymal Stem Cells Market Research Report

By Type

Human MSC, Mouse MSC, Rat MSC, Other

By Application

Research Institute, Hospital, Others

By Companies

Lonza, Thermo Fisher, Bio-Techne, ATCC, MilliporeSigma, PromoCell GmbH, Genlantis, Celprogen, Cell Applications, Cyagen Biosciences, Axol Bioscience

Regions Covered

North America, Europe, APAC, Latin America, MEA

Base Year

2020

Historical Year

2018 to 2019 (Data from 2010 can be provided as per availability)

Forecast Year

2028

Number of Pages

241

Number of Tables & Figures

169

Customization Available

Yes, the report can be customized as per your need.

The global Mesenchymal Stem Cells market is segmented on the basis of:

Types

Human MSC, Mouse MSC, Rat MSC, Other

The product segment provides information about the market share of each product and the respective CAGR during the forecast period. It lays out information about the product pricing parameters, trends, and profits that provides in-depth insights of the market. Furthermore, it discusses latest product developments & innovation in the market.

Applications

Research Institute, Hospital, Others

The application segment fragments various applications of the product and provides information on the market share and growth rate of each application segment. It discusses the potential future applications of the products and driving and restraining factors of each application segment.

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We have studied the Mesenchymal Stem Cells Market in 360 degrees via. both primary & secondary research methodologies. This helped us in building an understanding of the current market dynamics, supply-demand gap, pricing trends, product preferences, consumer patterns & so on. The findings were further validated through primary research with industry experts & opinion leaders across countries. The data is further compiled & validated through various market estimation & data validation methodologies. Further, we also have our in-house data forecasting model to predict market growth up to 2028.

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The geographical analysis part of the report provides information about the product sales in terms of volume and revenue in regions. It lays out potential opportunities for the new entrants, emerging players, and major players in the region. The regional analysis is done after considering the socio-economic factors and government regulations of the countries in the regions.

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Global Mesenchymal Stem Cells Market by Type (Human MSC, Mouse MSC, Rat MSC, Other), By Application (Research Institute, Hospital, Others) And By...

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Stem Cell Therapy Market Analysis to 2025 – Growing Popularity and Emerging Trends – Technology Magazine

Stem cell therapy market is projected to surge owing to increasing government spending on research activities aimed at development of stem cell therapy for treatment of life-threatening diseases. Stem cell therapy, also known as regenerative medicine, promotes repair response of dysfunctional, diseased, or injured tissue using derivatives of stem cells. Researchers are examining different aspects of stem cell therapy for its applications in neurological disorders and other diseases.

Growing prevalence of chronic diseases owing to genetic disorders and unhealthy lifestyle adoption among masses will positively impact stem cell therapy market outlook. Stem cell therapy offers various benefits over conventional therapeutic methods, which makes it preferable for curing degenerative cell disorders. For instance, researchers are extensively seeking to regenerate healthy heart cells from placenta to treat patients after myocardial infarction. Advancing researches in stem cell therapy offer better prospects for curing cardiovascular diseases and minimizing mortality rates.

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A stem cell therapy market forecast report has projected that orthopedic segment is estimated to observe more than 9% growth rate over 2019-2025. The growth of orthopedic stem cell industry share can be accredited to increase in number of trauma and accidents cases across the globe. Stem cell therapy has successfully found its application in treatment of bone-joint injuries which include fractured bone and spinal defects, femoral head, osteogenesis imperfecta, and ligament tendon.

Mesenchymal stem cell therapy has gained preference in treatment of orthopedic diseases such as osteoporosis and arthritis owing to its potential to differentiate between cartilage and bone, positively influencing the overall stem cell therapy market trends.

Reports have predicted that Europe stem cell therapy industry size is slated to witness about 10% growth over 2019-2025. The growth of the industry in Europe can be attributed to intensifying prevalence of chronic diseases. Furthermore, the regulatory setup for stem cell therapies has also been improving gradually and impacting stem cell therapy market size.

Initially, the demand of stem cell therapies was low in Europe due to the stringent regulations in the region. However, surging awareness among people in regard to the benefits associated with stem cell therapy has escalated its adoption. Increasing adoption along with a favorable regulatory scenario is likely to push stem cell therapy industry share.

There are several prominent market players partaking in stem cell therapy industry share including Cellectis, Astellas Pharma, Celyad, Gamida Cell, ReNeuron Group, Capricor Therapeutics, Novadip Biosciences, Cellular Dynamics, CESCA Therapeutics, OxStem, Mesoblast, Takeda Pharmaceuticals, and DiscGenics.

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Partial Chapter of the Table of Content

Chapter 4. Stem Cell Therapy Market, By Type

4.1. Key segment trends

4.2. Allogenic stem cell therapy

4.2.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

4.3. Autologous stem cell therapy

4.3.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

Chapter 5. Stem Cell Therapy Market, By Application

5.1. Key segment trends

5.2. Oncology

5.2.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

5.3. Orthopedic

5.3.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

5.4. Cardiovascular

5.4.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

5.5. Neurology

5.5.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

5.6. Others

5.6.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

Chapter 6. Stem Cell Therapy Market, By End-users

6.1. Key segment trends

6.2. Hospitals

6.2.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

6.3. Clinics

6.3.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

6.4. Others

6.4.1. Market size, by region, 2014-2025 (USD Million)

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Stem Cell Therapy Market Analysis to 2025 - Growing Popularity and Emerging Trends - Technology Magazine

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Mesenchymal Stem Cells Market Research, Growth Opportunities, Analysis and Forecasts Report 2020-2025|Covid-19 Recovery – AlgosOnline

Key growth factors studied in Mesenchymal Stem Cells market report: pricing structure, profit margins, supply-demand scenario, production, and industry value chain, and Covid-19 impact.

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The report on Mesenchymal Stem Cells market offers an in-depth assessment of the business space. According to the study, the Mesenchymal Stem Cells market is presumed to record a substantial growth rate and generate prominent returns during the forecast timeframe.

The report highlights key industry trends while elaborating on market size, revenue forecast, growth avenues and sales volume. Crucial insights regarding the drivers that will positively impact the profitability graph, alongside the analysis of various segmentations impelling the market size is presented in the report.

Unravelling the Mesenchymal Stem Cells market in terms of the regional spectrum:

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Major takeaways of the Mesenchymal Stem Cells market report are listed below:

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Mesenchymal Stem Cells Market Research, Growth Opportunities, Analysis and Forecasts Report 2020-2025|Covid-19 Recovery - AlgosOnline

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