Gain Therapeutics and University of Maryland School of Medicine Announce Research Collaboration – GlobeNewswire

BETHESDA, Md. and BALTIMORE, Nov. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Gain Therapeutics, Inc. (Gain), today announced a research collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), to investigate Gains structurally targeted allosteric regulators (STARs) in cellular models of neuronopathic Gaucher disease (nGD) and Parkinsons disease (PD). STARs are proprietary small molecules targeting novel allosteric binding sites on enzymes. These small molecule drug candidates are designed to cross the blood brain barrier and penetrate other hard to treat organs such as bone and cartilage, stabilize the effective enzyme to restore function and reduce toxic substrate. Research will be led by Ricardo A. Feldman, Ph.D., Associate Professor, of Microbiology and Immunology in UMSOM.

Under the terms of the collaboration, UMSOM will investigate Gains STAR candidates in macrophage and neuronal models of nGD and GBA-associated PD. These diseases are characterized by mutations in the GBA gene, where misfolding of the enzyme encoded by GBA (beta-glucocerebrosidase (GCase)) interferes with its normal transport to the lysosome. The research program will aim to further elucidate the mechanism of action of Gains STAR candidates by studying their effect on GCase, including GCases enzyme activity and transport to the lysosome. Additionally, other effects such as prevention of alpha-synuclein aggregation in PD dopaminergic neurons will be evaluated.

We are exceedingly proud to be advancing our work in nGD and Parkinsons in close collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said Eric Richman, Chief Executive Officer at Gain. The expertise and experience of UMSOM and Dr. Feldman will be instrumental as we work to further validate the exciting potential of Gains STAR candidate for these devastating diseases. I am confident these foundational studies will bring us closer to a potential new treatment option for those with these disorders.

Dr. Feldman added, Our laboratory has used human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of GD and GBA-associated PD to uncover the molecular mechanisms leading to these diseases. We have also developed very sensitive assays to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of small molecules in reversing the phenotypic abnormalities caused by mutant GBA in the cell types affected by these diseases, including macrophages and neuronal cells. I have been impressed by Gains initial results evaluating the potential of STARs in correcting enzyme misfolding and restoring function, and look forward to working with Gains team to further advance its program to treat these diseases.

Gain and UMSOM intend to report initial data from the collaboration in the first half of 2021.

About Gain Therapeutics, Inc.Gain Therapeutics is redefining drug discovery with its SEE-Tx target identification platform. By identifying and optimizing allosteric binding sites that have never before been targeted, Gain is unlocking new treatment options for difficult-to-treat disorders characterized by protein misfolding. Gain was originally established in 2017 with the support of its founders and institutional investors such as TiVenture, 3B Future Health Fund (previously known as Helsinn Investment Fund) and VitaTech. It has been awarded funding support from The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinsons Research (MJFF) and The Silverstein Foundation for Parkinsons with GBA, as well as from the Eurostars-2 joint program with co-funding from the European Union Horizon 2020 research and Innosuisse. In July 2020, Gain Therapeutics, Inc. completed a share exchange with Gain Therapeutics, SA., a Swiss corporation, whereby GT Gain Therapeutics SA became a wholly owned subsidiary of Gain Therapeutics, Inc. For more information, visit https://www.gaintherapeutics.com/.

Forward-Looking StatementsAny statements in this release that are not historical facts may be considered to be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are based on managements current expectations and are subject to risks and uncertainties which may cause results to differ materially and adversely from the statements contained herein. Such statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding Gain Therapeutics, Inc. (Gain) expected use of the proceeds from the Series B financing round; the market opportunity for Gains product candidates; and the business strategies and development plans of Gain. Some of the potential risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those predicted include Gains ability to: make commercially available its products and technologies in a timely manner or at all; enter into other strategic alliances, including arrangements for the development and distribution of its products; obtain intellectual property protection for its assets; accurately estimate its expenses and cash burn and raise additional funds when necessary. Undue reliance should not be placed on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date they are made. Except as required by law, Gain does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect new information, events or circumstances after the date they are made, or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

Gain Therapeutics Investor Contact:Daniel FerryLifeSci Advisors+1 617-430-7576daniel@lifesciadvisors.com

Gain Therapeutics Media Contact:Cait Williamson, Ph.D.LifeSci Communications+1 646-751-4366cait@lifescicomms.com

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Telix Pharmaceuticals Limited Acquires TheraPharm GmbH, Broadening Reach to Hematologic Cancers and Transplant Medicine – GlobeNewswire

MELBOURNE, Australia and BAAR, Switzerland, Nov. 29, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Telix Pharmaceuticals Limited (ASX: TLX, Telix, the Company) announces it has entered into an agreement with Scintec Diagnostics GmbH (Scintec) to acquire TheraPharm GmbH (TheraPharm), a Swiss-German biotechnology company developing innovative diagnostic and therapeutic solutions in the field of hematology.

The acquisition of TheraPharm provides Telix with access to a portfolio of patents, technologies, production systems, clinical data and know-how in relation to the use of Molecularly Targeted Radiation (MTR) in hematology and immunology. TheraPharm is developing antibody MTR technology against CD66, a cell surface target highly expressed by neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. As such, the technology has potentially very broad applications in the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic diseases (e.g. blood cancers), lymphoproliferative disorders and immune-mediated diseases (e.g. lupus, and multiple sclerosis). Of particular interest is the demonstrated use of the technology to safely and effectively perform bone marrow conditioning (BMC) prior to bone marrow stem cell transplant.

Telix CEO, Dr. Christian Behrenbruch stated, Telix is committed to extending and improving the lives of patients with serious diseases. As such, the acquisition of TheraPharm and its MTR assets are uniquely aligned to Telixs mission and technical strengths in antibody engineering and radiochemistry. TheraPharms technology has a significant role to play in BMC and stem cell transplantation across a broad range of blood cancers and rare diseases. The current approach to BMC employs highly toxic drugs that have a poor morbidity and mortality profile, and for which many patients are ineligible. MTR offers an excellent safety profile that may greatly expand the number of patients able to undergo life prolonging stem cell transplantation while greatly reducing the hospitalisation burden and cost associated with such procedures.

TheraPharm co-founder and Managing Director, Dr. Klaus Bosslet added, Over the past 5 years, TheraPharm, in collaboration with Dr. Kim Orchard from the University of Southampton (UK), has made excellent progress developing 90Y-besilesomab for the treatment of hematologic cancers and several related conditions including multiple myeloma, leukemia and amyloidosis. This unique asset is a logical addition to Telixs portfolio, offering a potentially rapid development path to a first commercial indication for the treatment of patients with SALA, while at the same time having potentially broad applications for stem cell transplantation in patients with more common cancers of the blood, including multiple myeloma and leukemia. We look forward to joining the Telix team in order to expedite the development of products for this under-served field.

Full transaction details, including financial terms, can be found via the Telix website and ASX portal here.

About Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT)

Bone marrow conditioning (BMC) followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is presently performed to treat patients with hematologic malignancies (blood cancers), with the objective of extending patient survival or achieving cure. HSCT is also performed for a broad range of non-cancer conditions. HSCT is preferentially performed in countries of high income (Europe >30,000, Americas >20,000, worldwide >65,000 p.a., respectively) and is growing at around 5% annually.

About Systemic Amyloid Light-Chain Amyloidosis (SALA)

SALA is a rare, but serious protein deposition disease, caused by a protein known as amyloid that is produced by abnormal plasma cells residing in the bone marrow. As amyloid accumulates in the organs of the body, organ function will eventually deteriorate, ultimately causing organ failure. SALA has an estimated prevalence of 30,000 and 45,000 in United States and Europe, respectively and while a rare disease, SALA portends a very poor prognosis, with a median survival from diagnosis of ~11 months if untreated.

The current standard of care comprises of induction therapy (typically cyclophosphamide, bortezomib, dexamethasone) plus high dose melphalan BMC, followed by HSCT. This approach is typically only accessible to a small proportion of patients (<20%) who are able to tolerate induction therapy and melphalan BMC.

About Telix Pharmaceuticals Limited

Telix is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of diagnostic and therapeutic products using Molecularly Targeted Radiation (MTR). Telix is headquartered in Melbourne, Australia with international operations in Belgium, Japan and the United States. Telix is developing a portfolio of clinical-stage oncology products that address significant unmet medical needs in prostate, kidney and brain cancer. Telix is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX: TLX). For more information visit http://www.telixpharma.com.

About TheraPharm GmbH

TheraPharm is a biotechnology company specialised in the research, development and manufacturing of monoclonal antibodies for targeted radiation of hematopoietic malignant and non-malignant diseases, lymphoproliferative diseases, conditioning for allogeneic stem cells as well as in diagnostics of inflammatory diseases and bone marrow metastases.

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Coronavirus treatments and vaccines. Here are the latest developments – San Francisco Chronicle

Scientists at Bay Area universities, laboratories, biotechnology companies and drug manufacturers are fashioning drug concoctions out of blood plasma, chimpanzee viruses and cells taken from bone marrow in the race to rid the world of COVID-19.

The microbial treasure hunt is not just to find a cure which may not be possible but to control the debilitating health problems caused by the coronavirus.

Major progress has been made this year. The antiviral drug remdesivir, produced in Foster City, has improved recovery times, and the steroid dexamethasone has cut the number of deaths in severely ill patients.

What follows is a list of some of the most promising medications and vaccines with ties to the Bay Area:

Antibodies

and Immunity

Mesenchymal stem cells / UCSF and UC Davis Medical Center:

UCSF Dr. Michael Matthay is leading a study of whether a kind of stem cell found in bone marrow can help critically ill patients with severe respiratory failure, known as ARDS. Matthay hopes the stem cells can help reduce the inflammation associated with some of ARDS most dire respiratory symptoms, and help patients lungs recover.

In all, 120 patients are being enrolled at UCSF Medical Center, Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, the UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento and hospitals in Oregon and Texas. He said the trial, which includes a small number of ARDS patients who dont have COVID-19, should have results by summer or fall 2021. So far, 28 patients are enrolled in San Francisco.

Lambda-interferon / Stanford University:

Lambda-interferon is a manufactured version of a naturally occurring protein that had been used to treat hepatitis, and researchers hoped it would help patients in the early stages of COVID-19.

Stanford researchers completed their trial of lambda-interferon and found that it did not boost the immune system response to coronavirus infections.

That trial did not find any difference in outcomes between the treatment and placebo, said Yvonne Maldonado, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at Lucile Packard Childrens Hospital at Stanford, where 120 patients were enrolled in the trial. It didnt work.

Antiviral drugs

Remdesivir / Gilead Sciences (Foster City):

Remdesivir, once conceived as a potential treatment for Ebola, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in October for use on hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Trademarked under the name Veklury, the drug interferes with the process through which the virus replicates itself. It was one of the drugs given to President Trump and has been used regularly in hospitals under what is known as an emergency use authorization.

It was approved after three clinical trials showed hospitalized coronavirus patients who received remdesivir recovered five days faster on average than those who received a placebo. Patients who required oxygen recovered seven days faster, according to the studies.

Gilead now plans to conduct clinical trials to see how remdesivir works on pediatric patients, from newborns to teenagers, with moderate to severe COVID-19 symptoms. Remdesivir is also being studied with steroids and other drugs to see if it works better as part of a medicinal cocktail. An inhalable form of the drug is also being developed.

Favipiravir / Fujifilm Toyama Chemical (Stanford University):

This antiviral drug, developed in 2014 by a subsidiary of the Japanese film company to treat influenza, is undergoing numerous clinical studies worldwide, including a trial involving 180 patients at Stanford University.

Stanford epidemiologists are testing favipiravir to see if it prevents the coronavirus from replicating in human cells, halts the shedding of the virus and reduces the severity of infection. Unlike remdesivir, it can be administered orally, so it can be used to treat patients early in the disease, before hospitalization is necessary.

The Stanford study has so far enrolled about 90 patients, who are given the drug within 72 hours of when they were first diagnosed with COVID-19. Half of them get a placebo. People can enroll by emailing treatcovid@stanford.edu.

Monoclonal antibodies

REGN-COV2 / Regeneron Pharmaceuticals / Stanford School of Medicine:

The REGN-COV2 cocktail is the same one Trump received, and Stanford is one of dozens of locations nationwide where clinical trials are being held. Two separate trials are under way at Stanford one for hospitalized patients, the other for outpatients. A third trial is about to begin for people who arent sick but are in contact with carriers of the virus.

Regeneron halted testing on severely ill patients requiring high-flow oxygen or mechanical ventilation after the independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board determined that the drug was unlikely to help them.

The drug is a combination of two monoclonal antibodies lab-made clones of the antibodies produced naturally in people who have recovered from COVID-19. The antibodies bind to the virus spike protein and block the virus ability to enter cells.

Dr. Aruna Subramanian, professor of infectious diseases at Stanford and lead investigator for the inpatient trial, said the 21 hospitalized patients in the study receive a high dose like Trump, a lower dose or a placebo. Subramanian plans to expand the inpatient trial to 45 patients. The outpatient study has enrolled a little more than 40 of the 60 patients researchers intend to sign up.

Theres enough promising evidence that it helps people early in the infection, Subramanian said. What we dont know is whether it helps people who are pretty sick but not critically ill.

Bamlanivimab / Eli Lilly / Stanford and UCSF:

Stanford and UCSF are testing the Eli Lilly monoclonal antibodies on outpatients after the pharmaceutical company halted trials on hospitalized COVID-19 patients because of adverse results.

Dr. Andra Blomkalns, chair of emergency medicine at Stanford and the lead in the Eli Lilly outpatient trial, said she is now enrolling older people with comorbidities like heart disease, chronic lung disease, a history of strokes and severe obesity shortly after they test positive.

The hypothesis is that the bamlanivimab monotherapy, which is very similar to the Regeneron monoclonals, might work best early in the infection. Although about 400 patients have been enrolled in the Lilly phase 3 trials nationwide, to date fewer than 10 have been enrolled at Stanford and UCSF.

Matthay, who headed up the Lilly monoclonal study with LY-CoV555 at UCSF, said the cancellation of this inpatient trial was disappointing, but just because this one did not work, doesnt mean another one wont work for hospitalized patients.

Blomkalns said the testing criteria has been changing. She expects the outpatient trial to open soon to adolescents ages 12 and up to determine whether the drug can be used as a preventive.

Designer monoclonal antibodies / Vir Biotechnology, San Francisco:

Scientists at Vir are studying several types of monoclonal antibodies, including a type engineered to activate T cells, which can search out and destroy cells infected with the coronavirus. A study published in the journal Nature in October found that monoclonals, modified to bind with certain receptors, stimulated T cells and improved the human immune response.

By observing and learning from our bodys powerful natural defenses, we have discovered how to maximize the capacity of antibodies through the amplification of key characteristics that may enable more effective treatments for viral diseases, said Herbert Virgin, the chief scientific officer at Vir and co-author of the study.

A similarly modified monoclonal antibody, leronlimab, is being studied in coronavirus clinical trials by its Washington state drugmaker, CytoDyn, which has developed drugs to treat HIV. The companys chief medical officer is in San Francisco, and the company that does laboratory tests of leronlimab is in San Carlos.

Anti-inflammatory drugs

Colchicine / UCSF (San Francisco and New York):

The anti-inflammatory drug commonly used to treat gout flare-ups is being studied by scientists at UCSF and New York University. The drug short-circuits inflammation by decreasing the bodys production of certain proteins, and researchers hope that it will reduce lung complications and prevent deaths from COVID-19.

Preliminary results from a clinical trial found that Colchicine can be effective in reducing systemic symptoms of COVID-19 by inhibiting inflammatory biomarkers.

Selinexor / Kaiser Permanente:

Kaiser hospitals in San Francisco, Oakland and Sacramento are studying selinexor, an anticancer drug that blocks a key protein in the cellular machinery for DNA processing. Preliminary findings during the trials indicated that low doses of selinexor helped hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. The drug has both antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, and its administered orally, according to Kaisers Dr. Jacek Skarbinski.

Vaccines

VXA-COV2-1 / Vaxart, South San Francisco:

The biotechnology company Vaxart is testing VXA-COV2-1, the only potential vaccine in pill form. It uses the genetic code of the coronavirus to trigger a defensive response in mucous membranes. The hope is that the newly fortified membranes will prevent the virus from entering the body.

Its the only vaccine (candidate) that activates the first line of defense, which is the mucosa, said Andrei Floroiu, Vaxarts chief executive. He said intravenous vaccines kill the virus after it is inside the body, but this one stops it beforehand.

The drug, which is effective against influenza and norovirus, induced both neutralizing antibodies and T cells during coronavirus drug trials, according to preliminary trial results published in September.

VaxiPatch / Verndari (Napa and UC Davis Medical Center):

A Napa company, Verndari, is studying vaccines for COVID-19 that can be delivered using an adhesive patch. Researchers at UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento said the patch caused an immune response in preclinical tests.

An October report in the online journal ScienceDirect touted the system, saying it could serve as a shelter in place vaccination strategy, in which vulnerable populations receive delivery at home without needing to engage an already-overtaxed health care infrastructure.

If the vaccine is proven effective and safe, patients could receive it through the mail, according to Dr. Daniel Henderson, Verndaris chief executive officer.

ChAdOx1 / AstraZeneca (UCSF, San Francisco General Hospital, Bridge HIV):

Enrollment is under way at 80 sites in the United States, including three in the Bay Area, for the phase 3 trial of AstraZenecas vaccine, developed by Oxford University from an adenovirus, which typically causes colds in chimpanzees.

At least 1,000 of the 40,000 participants in the phase 3 AstraZeneca trial will be from the Bay Area, including 500 at Sutter Healths East Bay AIDS Center in Oakland, 250 at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and another 250 at Bridge HIV San Francisco.

An interim analysis of trials in Britain and Brazil showed the vaccine was 90% effective in preventing COVID-19 in 131 patients who got a half-dose of the vaccine by mistake. The vaccine was only 62% effective in people who got a full dose, leading to major questions about the results and how the trial was conducted.

Bay Area trial leaders Dr. Annie Luetkemeyer of UCSF and Dr. Susan Buchbinder, director of Bridge HIV and a UCSF professor of medicine and epidemiology, are hoping future trial results are more clear. Thats because AstraZenecas vaccine is cheaper than those made by its rivals Pfizer and Moderna, whose vaccines were 95% and 94.5% effective in preliminary tests.

The AstraZeneca candidate can also be stored at temperatures between 36 and 46 degrees Fahrenheit, which is orders of magnitude higher than the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines must be kept at 94 degrees below zero Fahrenheit, colder than many storage facilities can manage.

Johnson & Johnson (Stanford University)

The Johnson & Johnson clinical trials have enrolled 20,000 of the 60,000 volunteers worldwide that officials expect to have signed up by Christmas. That includes 70 people at Stanford.

The vaccine is, like the AstraZeneca version, a chimpanzee adenovirus that was genetically altered so that it carries the RNA of the coronavirus spike protein. The technique inspires the body to produce antibodies that block the protein without causing people to get sick.

Phase 2 studies show that it produces a good immune response and the early results of phase 3 show that its safe, said Dr. Philip Grant, assistant professor of infectious disease at Stanford and leader of the trial.

Grant, who is enrolling about 15 people a day for the trial, said he doesnt expect results on the vaccines effectiveness until sometime in March.

Peter Fimrite is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: pfimrite@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @pfimrite

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Stem Cell Assay Market Research Report: Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers with Forecast 2026 – Cheshire Media

The Stem Cell Assay Market grew in 2019, as compared to 2018, according to our report, Stem Cell Assay Market is likely to have subdued growth in 2020 due to weak demand on account of reduced industry spending post Covid-19 outbreak. Further, Stem Cell Assay Market will begin picking up momentum gradually from 2021 onwards and grow at a healthy CAGR between 2021-2025

Deep analysis about market status (2016-2019), competition pattern, advantages and disadvantages of products, industry development trends (2019-2025), regional industrial layout characteristics and macroeconomic policies, industrial policy has also been included. From raw materials to downstream buyers of this industry have been analysed scientifically. This report will help you to establish comprehensive overview of the Stem Cell Assay Market

Get a Sample Copy of the Report at: https://i2iresearch.com/report/global-stem-cell-assay-market-2020-market-size-share-growth-trends-forecast-2025/#download-sample

The Stem Cell Assay Market is analysed based on product types, major applications and key players

Key product type:ViabilityPurificationIdentification

Key applications:Regenerative MedicineClinical Research

Key players or companies covered are:MerckThermo Fisher ScientificGE HealthcareAgilent TechnologiesBio-Rad LaboratoriesPromegaCell BiolabsPerkinElmerMiltenyi BiotecHemoGenixBio-TechneSTEMCELL

The report provides analysis & data at a regional level (North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East & Africa , Rest of the world) & Country level (13 key countries The U.S, Canada, Germany, France, UK, Italy, China, Japan, India, Middle East, Africa, South America)

Inquire or share your questions, if any: https://i2iresearch.com/report/global-stem-cell-assay-market-2020-market-size-share-growth-trends-forecast-2025/

Key questions answered in the report:1. What is the current size of the Stem Cell Assay Market, at a global, regional & country level?2. How is the market segmented, who are the key end user segments?3. What are the key drivers, challenges & trends that is likely to impact businesses in the Stem Cell Assay Market?4. What is the likely market forecast & how will be Stem Cell Assay Market impacted?5. What is the competitive landscape, who are the key players?6. What are some of the recent M&A, PE / VC deals that have happened in the Stem Cell Assay Market?

The report also analysis the impact of COVID 19 based on a scenario-based modelling. This provides a clear view of how has COVID impacted the growth cycle & when is the likely recovery of the industry is expected to pre-covid levels.

Contact us:i2iResearch info to intelligenceLocational Office: *India, *United States, *GermanyEmail: [emailprotected]Toll-free: +1-800-419-8865 | Phone: +91 98801 53667

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Stem Cell Assay Market Research Report: Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers with Forecast 2026 - Cheshire Media

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Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market Research Report 2020 with Manufacturing Process Analysis and Market Concentration Rate till 2026 – The Market…

The Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market grew in 2019, as compared to 2018, according to our report, Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market is likely to have subdued growth in 2020 due to weak demand on account of reduced industry spending post Covid-19 outbreak. Further, Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market will begin picking up momentum gradually from 2021 onwards and grow at a healthy CAGR between 2021-2025

Deep analysis about market status (2016-2019), competition pattern, advantages and disadvantages of products, industry development trends (2019-2025), regional industrial layout characteristics and macroeconomic policies, industrial policy has also been included. From raw materials to downstream buyers of this industry have been analysed scientifically. This report will help you to establish comprehensive overview of the Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market

Get a Sample Copy of the Report at: https://i2iresearch.com/report/global-human-embryonic-stem-cell-(hesc)-market-2020-market-size-share-growth-trends-forecast-2025/#download-sample

The Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market is analysed based on product types, major applications and key players

Key product type:Totipotent Stem CellPluripotent Stem CellUnipotent Stem Cell

Key applications:ResearchClinical TrialsOthers

Key players or companies covered are:Astellas Institute of Regenerative Medicine (US)Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc. (US)BD Biosciences (US)Cell Cure Neurosciences Ltd. (Israel)Cellular Dynamics International (US)GE Healthcare (UK)MilliporeSigma (US)PerkinElmer, Inc. (US)Reliance Life Sciences Ltd. (India)Research & Diagnostics Systems, Inc. (US)SABiosciences Corp. (US)STEMCELL Technologies, Inc. (Canada)Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc. (US)Takara Bio, Inc. (Japan)TATAA Biocenter AB (Sweden)Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc. (US)UK Stem Cell Bank (UK)ViaCyte, Inc. (US)Vitrolife AB (Sweden)

The report provides analysis & data at a regional level (North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East & Africa , Rest of the world) & Country level (13 key countries The U.S, Canada, Germany, France, UK, Italy, China, Japan, India, Middle East, Africa, South America)

Inquire or share your questions, if any: https://i2iresearch.com/report/global-human-embryonic-stem-cell-(hesc)-market-2020-market-size-share-growth-trends-forecast-2025/

Key questions answered in the report:1. What is the current size of the Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market, at a global, regional & country level?2. How is the market segmented, who are the key end user segments?3. What are the key drivers, challenges & trends that is likely to impact businesses in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market?4. What is the likely market forecast & how will be Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market impacted?5. What is the competitive landscape, who are the key players?6. What are some of the recent M&A, PE / VC deals that have happened in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market?

The report also analysis the impact of COVID 19 based on a scenario-based modelling. This provides a clear view of how has COVID impacted the growth cycle & when is the likely recovery of the industry is expected to pre-covid levels.

Contact us:i2iResearch info to intelligenceLocational Office: *India, *United States, *GermanyEmail: [emailprotected]Toll-free: +1-800-419-8865 | Phone: +91 98801 53667

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Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) Market Research Report 2020 with Manufacturing Process Analysis and Market Concentration Rate till 2026 - The Market...

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Government of Canada and JDRF Canada announce new research funding to accelerate stem cell-based therapies for type 1 diabetes – Philippine Canadian…

There are more than 300,000 Canadians living with type 1 diabetes (T1D), an autoimmune disease with no known cause or cure, resulting in the dysfunction, damage or loss of pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin in our bodies. People with T1D must treat themselves with insulin several times per day to keep their blood glucose levels normal, and despite their best efforts, they often experience serious, and even life-threatening, complications.

To mark the end of Diabetes Awareness Month, Sonia Sidhu, Member of Parliament for Brampton South, on behalf of the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Health, announced an investment of $6 million through the CIHR-JDRF Partnership to Defeat Diabetes for two Canadian research teams to accelerate the development of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of T1D.

Stem cells show great promise as a source of insulin-producing cells that could be transplanted to provide a new source of insulin, to replace dysfunctional, damagedor lost pancreatic beta cells. Canada has a remarkable legacy in leading discoveries in this area. Stem cells were discovered in Toronto in 1961, and in 2000, a team in Edmonton were the first to pioneer transplantation of pancreatic islets (the part of the pancreas that contains insulin-producing cells). These achievements represent important steps toward a treatment that will allow people with T1D to live healthy lives without daily insulin injections.

The research teams are led by Dr. Maria Cristina Nostro at the University Health Network and the University of Toronto and Dr. Francis Lynn at the BC Childrens Hospital Research Institute and the University of British Columbia. The teams will build on Canadas demonstrated research excellence and leadership in clinical islet transplantation, stem cell biology, diabetes, immunology and genetic engineering to accelerate stem cell-based therapies for T1D. They will work in collaboration with other Canadian researchers to tackle some of the biggest scientific challenges that impede our progress in this area and move us closer to a future where people with T1D will no longer rely on insulin therapy.

This funding was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism and Diabetes (CIHR-INMD), and JDRF Canada, through the CIHR-JDRF Partnership to Defeat Diabetes established in 2017. Each partner will invest $3 million over five years. This investment is part of a large research initiative,100 Years of Insulin: Accelerating Canadian Discoveries to Defeat Diabetes, funded by CIHR and partners. This initiative commemorates the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin to be marked in 2021a discovery that changed the lives of millions of Canadians and people around the world and won researchers Sir Frederick Banting and John Macleod the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

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Government of Canada and JDRF Canada announce new research funding to accelerate stem cell-based therapies for type 1 diabetes - Philippine Canadian...

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California’s stem cell research agency looks to the future – Bond Buyer

Now that its been given a new lease on life after the passage of Proposition 14, a statewide $5.5 billion ballot measure, Californias bond-funded stem cell research agency will re-write its budget.

The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine was created in 2004 when voters approve Proposition 71, allocating $3 billion in general obligation bond proceeds to stem cell research.

It was running out of money and the bulk of discussion at the July meeting of the 29-member Independent Citizens Oversight Committee was about how to wind down operations. It also made plans for moving forward should Proposition 14 pass.

They had been operating on a dual track looking at what would occur with and without the passage of Proposition 14, said California Controller Betty Yee. They looked at everything the original $3 billion bond had supported, whether it was facilities, or intellectual property, and where all that would have been housed if Proposition 14 had not passed.

California Controller

But when the six-member Citizens Financial Accountability Oversight Committee chaired by Yee met Friday, talk was about the future for stem cell research in the state.CIRMs President and Chief Executive Officer Dr. Maria Millan asked Yee for time to submit a revised budget, taking into account the passage of the $5.5 billion bond measure.

With California residents struggling under the weight of the pandemic, voters looked upon anything requiring a tax increase unfavorably, except for the stem cell bond measure.

Some of the voters, or a good portion of voters are already familiar with work in the stem cell area, but I definitely think the pandemic had an impact, Yee said. This is state-funded research that has already shown progress in terms of clinical trials at a time when we are all anxious about the development of a vaccine.

In March 2020, as COVID-19 cases struck the U.S., the ICOC convened an emergency meeting and voted to redirect $5 million in grant funding from the 2004 $3 billion bond measure to support stem cell research toward vaccines for COVID-19. The grant review process also contained the stipulation that research targeting populations with racial and economic barriers to health care access and treatments would be prioritized, Yee said.

The $5 million didnt buy a lot, but it did help get information out to underserved communities, she said. And it put a model out there of how CIRM has been able to accelerate research projects.

Yees committee is responsible for reviewing CIRMs independent audit and making sure internal financial controls are in place.

We do an independent quality control review of it, she said. That responsibility was outlined in Proposition 71 and remains under Proposition 14.

The new bond measure added an additional performance review of operations and management systems.

Yee, who has chaired CFAOC since being elected controller in 2015, said CIRMs audits have received no negative opinions from the independent auditor during her tenure.

I always have my sixth sense, and its a complex organization with complex financial controls, but since I have chaired the committee all the audits have been completed and they have received no negative opinions from the independent auditor, she said.

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California's stem cell research agency looks to the future - Bond Buyer

Read more
Scientists Reveal a New Drug That Directs Stem Cells To Desired Sites – Science Times

Researchers at Stanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute recently developed a drug that can lure stem cells to impaired tissue and enhance the efficacy of treatment.

This is considered a "scientific first," not to mention a major advance for the field of regenerative drugs. Such a discovery, which theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences or PNASpublished could enhance the present stem cell treatments developed to cure such neurological disorders like stroke, spinal cord injury, ALS or other amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as other neurodegenerative diseases -- and have their use expanded to new conditions such as arthritis or heart disease.

In the study, toxic or green cells disappeared when mice with a neurodegenerative condition were given both therapeutic or red cells and the drug SDV1a, which matched with delayed onset of symptoms and longer lives.

(Photo : Stem Cell Research via Getty Images)In this undated handout photo released by the Institute for Stem Cell Research in 2005, neurons (red) and astrocytes (green), which can be made from neural stem cells, are seen.

Results Suggesting Efficacy of the Drug

The study results proposed that SDV1a can be used to enhance the stem cell treatments' efficacy. According to Evan Snyder, MD, PhD, theCenter for Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine at Stanford Burnham Prebysprofessor and director, "the ability to instruct a stem cell where to go in the body, or to a particular region of a given organ is the 'Holy Grail' for regenerative medicine.

Snyder, who's also the senior author of the study, added, now, for the first time, stem cells can be directed to a desired area and focus its therapeutic effect.

Almost a decade-and-a-half back, the senior author, together with his team, found that stem cells are drawn to infection, a biological 'fire alarm' indicating that damage has taken place.

Nevertheless, using inflammation as a healing appeal is not possible since an inflammation environment can be dangerous to the body. Hence, researchers have been searching for mechanisms to help in the migration of stem cells or 'home' to the body's desired areas.

Such a mechanism or tool, according to reports on this new finding, would be a great contributor for disorders in which preliminary inflammatory indicators disappear over time, like chronic spinal cord injury or stroke, and conditions where the inflammation's role is not clearly understood, like heart disease, for one.

Fortunately, after decades of investing in stem cell science, scientists are now making "tremendous progress," saidCalifornia Institute for Regenerative Medicine or CIRMpresident and CEO Maria Millan, MD said, in their understanding of the manner such cells work and the manner they can be attached to help reverse disease or an injury.

The CIRM partially funded this new study. Millan also said, Snyder's group has identified a medicine that could enhance "the ability of neural stem cells to home to sites of injury and initiate repair."

More so, the president and CEO also explained, the drug candidate could help fast-track the stem cell treatments' development, specifically for conditions including Alzheimer's disease and spinal cord injury.

In the research, study investigators modified an inflammatory molecule called CXCL12, which the Snyder's group discovered previously, could guide healing stem cells to areas that need repair to develop the SDV1a.

As such, this new medicine works by improving stem cell binding and minimizing inflammatory indicating and can be injected anywhere to attract stem cells to a particular site without causing any inflammation.

Since such inflammation can be dangerous, Snyder explained, they modified CXL12 by "tripping away the risky beat and maximizing the good bit."

Now, he added, they have a drug, drawing stem cells to an area of pathology, but not creating or worsening the unwanted infection.

"Now, we have a drug that draws stem cells to a region of pathology, but without creating or worsening unwanted inflammation."

Furthermore, to present that the new medication can improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy, the scientists implanted SDV1a and human neural stem cells into the brains of mice thatSandhoff disease, a neurodegenerative disease.

The scientists have already started testing the ability of SDV1a to enhance stem cell therapy in a mouse model of Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as ALS, which results from progressive loss of motor neurons in the brain.

Snyder said they are optimistic that the mechanism of action of this new drug may potentially benefit various neurodegenerative disorders and non-neurological conditions like arthritis, heart disease, and even brain cancer.

Interestingly, he also explained, since CXL12 and its receptor is said to be implicated in cytokine storm that exemplifies severeCOVID-19, some of their understandings of how to constrain infection without controlling other normal procedures selectively may be helpful in that field, as well.

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Check out more news and information onStem Cellsin Science Times.

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Scientists Reveal a New Drug That Directs Stem Cells To Desired Sites - Science Times

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Growing Value of Stem Cells in Medicine to Create a US$2,4 Billion Opportunity for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell ((iPSC) – GlobeNewswire

New York, Nov. 25, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "Global Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) Industry" - https://www.reportlinker.com/p05798831/?utm_source=GNW 4 billion by the year 2027, trailing a post COVID-19 CAGR of 6.6%, over the analysis period 2020 through 2027. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that hold the capability to divide, and differentiate into specialized cells in the body. Stem cells act as repair system and replenish adult tissues, maintaining the turnover of regenerative organs such as the blood and skin. In organs, such as the bone marrow, stem cells frequently form replacement cells to repair the worn out tissue. These cells can respond to signals from the body and transverse a particular developmental pathway to differentiate into one specific cell type. Due to their regenerative properties, stem cells are being researched for therapeutic applications in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disease, cancer, autoimmune diseases, spinal cord defects, among others. Stem Cell research is an exciting field where continuous discoveries are being made on new sources of stem cells and new methods of their acquisition and harvesting. Of late, adult stem cells have garnered a lions share of the stem cell space, purely based on the fact that they require less expensive clinical trials, need to comply with fewer regulatory norms and ethical issues compared to other stem cell variants such as embryonic stem cells.

Researchers around the world have been focusing research activities to develop adult stem cell therapies in order to combat a variety of diseases ranging from diabetes to heart disease. Factually, adult stem cells are the only stem cells that have been approved for use in transplants for the treatment of diseases such as cancer. Interestingly, with drug development based on embryonic stem cells being challenged amid growing debate over ethics and regulation of this research, iPSCS offers an alternate step forward in the commercialization of stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine. Embryonic stem cell research continues to remain embroiled in ethical, religious, and political controversies across various countries around the world. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSs), which are reprogrammed to mimic embryonic stem cell-like state allowing expression of genes and human cells needed for therapeutic purposes, offers an attractive alternate way forwarding in furthering the goals of stem cell research. Pioneered in 2006 and developed in the following year, these cells are created by conversion of somatic cells into PSCs by introducing certain genes including Myc, Klf4, Oct3/4 and Sox2.

Pluripotent stem cells hold tremendous potential in the regenerative medicine arena. Based on their ability to proliferate indefinitely and develop into desirable cell type such as heart, liver, neuronal and pancreatic cells, iPSCs offer a source of new cells that can replace lost or damaged cells. For instance, iPSCs can be developed into beta islet cells, blood cells or neuronal cells for the treatment of diabetes, leukemia and neurological disorders, respectively. Parkinsons, Alzheimers & spinal cord injuries are key neurologic diseases expected to benefit from iPS research. Dramatic rise in cancer cases worldwide and the need for novel anti-cancer therapies will emerge as a key driver for the growth of iPSCs. Interest in cancer research soars high on new hopes of direct reprogramming of cancer cells with enforced expression of pluripotency factors and the resulting dedifferentiation of transformed cancer cells. The ongoing pandemic is also opening up new opportunities for Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by offering a reliable model for researchers involved in studying how coronavirus indirectly or directly affects different cells in the human body. Made from a small sample of blood or skin cells, hiPSCs are robust stem cells that can be developed into any cell type and then infected with the coronavirus in order to analyse the disease prognosis and the resulting effects. By deploying hiPSCs, researchers have identified that stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) and blood vessels remain directly exposed to COVID-19 infection. Scientists identified that a significant portion of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes ceased beating and expired within 3 days after being infected by coronavirus. Researchers can leverage the infected cardiomyocytes to screen for potential drug candidates that can restore their function and improve their survival; and also for identifying new antiviral drugs that potentially curtail coronavirus replication in the heart, reduce cardiac injury and curb the disease prognosis. Researchers can also utilize the infected cardiomyocytes to analyze COVID-induced myocarditis through addition of immune cells to their lab experiments.

Competitors identified in this market include, among others,

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05798831/?utm_source=GNW

I. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & REPORT SCOPE I-1

II. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY II-1

1. MARKET OVERVIEW II-1 Impact of Covid-19 and a Looming Global Recession II-1 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) Market Gains from Increasing Use in Research for COVID-19 II-1 Studies Employing iPSCs in COVID-19 Research II-2 Stem Cells, Application Areas, and the Different Types: A Prelude II-3 Applications of Stem Cells II-4 Types of Stem Cells II-4 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC): An Introduction II-5 Production of iPSCs II-6 First & Second Generation Mouse iPSCs II-6 Human iPSCs II-7 Key Properties of iPSCs II-7 Transcription Factors Involved in Generation of iPSCs II-7 Noteworthy Research & Application Areas for iPSCs II-8 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell ((iPSC) Market: Growth Prospects and Outlook II-9 Drug Development Application to Witness Considerable Growth II-11 Technical Breakthroughs, Advances & Clinical Trials to Spur Growth of iPSC Market II-11 North America Dominates Global iPSC Market II-12 Competition II-12 Recent Market Activity II-13 Select Innovation/Advancement II-16

2. FOCUS ON SELECT PLAYERS II-17 Axol Bioscience Ltd. (UK) II-17 Cynata Therapeutics Limited (Australia) II-17 Evotec SE (Germany) II-17 Fate Therapeutics, Inc. (USA) II-17 FUJIFILM Cellular Dynamics, Inc. (USA) II-18 Ncardia (Belgium) II-18 Pluricell Biotech (Brazil) II-18 REPROCELL USA, Inc. (USA) II-18 Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. (Japan) II-19 Takara Bio, Inc. (Japan) II-19 Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc. (USA) II-20 ViaCyte, Inc. (USA) II-20

3. MARKET TRENDS & DRIVERS II-21 Effective Research Programs Hold Key in Roll Out of Advanced iPSC Treatments II-21 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: A Giant Leap in the Therapeutic Applications II-21 Research Trends in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Space II-22 Exhibit 1: Worldwide Publication of hESC and hiPSC Research Papers for the Period 2008-2010, 2011-2013 and 2014-2016 II-22 Exhibit 2: Number of Original Research Papers on hESC and iPSC Published Worldwide (2014-2016) II-23 Concerns Related to Embryonic Stem Cells Shift the Focus onto iPSCs II-23 Regenerative Medicine: A Promising Application of iPSCs II-24 Induced Pluripotent: A Potential Competitor to hESCs? II-25 Exhibit 3: Global Regenerative Medicine Market Size in US$ Billion for 2019, 2021, 2023 and 2025 II-27 Exhibit 4: Global Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Market by Product (in %) for the Year 2019 II-27 Exhibit 5: Global Regenerative Medicines Market by Category: Breakdown (in %) for Biomaterials, Stem Cell Therapies and Tissue Engineering for 2019 II-28 Pluripotent Stem Cells Hold Significance for Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine II-28 Exhibit 6: Leading Causes of Mortality Worldwide: Number of Deaths in Millions & % Share of Deaths by Cause for 2017 II-30 Leading Causes of Mortality for Low-Income and High-Income Countries II-30 Growing Importance of iPSCs in Personalized Drug Discovery II-31 Persistent Advancements in Genetics Space and Subsequent Growth in Precision Medicine Augur Well for iPSCs Market II-33 Exhibit 7: Global Precision Medicine Market (In US$ Billion) for the Years 2018, 2021 & 2024 II-34 Increasing Prevalence of Chronic Disorders Supports Growth of iPSCs Market II-34 Exhibit 8: Worldwide Cancer Incidence: Number of New Cancer Cases Diagnosed for 2012, 2018 & 2040 II-35 Exhibit 9: Number of New Cancer Cases Reported (in Thousands) by Cancer Type: 2018 II-36 Exhibit 10: Fatalities by Heart Conditions: Estimated Percentage Breakdown for Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease, Stroke, and Others II-37 Exhibit 11: Rising Diabetes Prevalence Presents Opportunity for iPSCs Market: Number of Adults (20-79) with Diabetes (in Millions) by Region for 2017 and 2045 II-38 Aging Demographics Add to the Global Burden of Chronic Diseases, Presenting Opportunities for iPSCs Market II-38 Exhibit 12: Expanding Elderly Population Worldwide: Breakdown of Number of People Aged 65+ Years in Million by Geographic Region for the Years 2019 and 2030 II-39 Growth in Number of Genomics Projects Propels Market Growth II-39 Genomic Initiatives in Select Countries II-40 Exhibit 13: New Gene-Editing Tools Spur Interest and Investments in Genetics, Driving Lucrative Growth Opportunities for iPSCs: Total VC Funding (In US$ Million) in Genetics for the Years 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 II-41 Launch of Numerous iPSCs-Related Clinical Trials Set to Benefit Market Growth II-41 Exhibit 14: Number of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells based Studies by Select Condition: As on Oct 31, 2020 II-43 iPSCs-based Clinical Trial for Heart Diseases II-43 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Stroke Treatment II-44 ?Off-the-shelf? Stem Cell Treatment for Cancer Enters Clinical Trial II-44 iPSCs for Hematological Disorders II-44 Market Benefits from Growing Funding for iPSCs-Related R&D Initiatives II-44 Exhibit 15: Stem Cell Research Funding in the US (in US$ Million) for the Years 2016 through 2021 II-46 Human iPSC Banks: A Review of Emerging Opportunities and Drawbacks II-46 Human iPSC Banks Worldwide: An Overview II-48 Cell Sources and Reprogramming Methods Used by Select iPSC Banks II-49 Innovations, Research Studies & Advancements in iPSCs II-50 Key iPSC Research Breakthroughs for Regenerative Medicine II-50 Researchers Develop Novel Oncogene-Free and Virus-Free iPSC Production Method II-51 Scientists Study Concerns of Genetic Mutations in iPSCs II-52 iPSCs Hold Tremendous Potential in Transforming Research Efforts II-52 Researchers Highlight Potential Use of iPSCs for Developing Novel Cancer Vaccines II-54 Scientists Use Machine Learning to Improve Reliability of iPSC Self-Organization II-54 STEMCELL Technologies Unveils mTeSR? Plus II-55 Challenges and Risks Related to Pluripotent Stem Cells II-56 A Glance at Issues Related to Reprogramming of Adult Cells to iPSCs II-57 A Note on Legal, Social and Ethical Considerations with iPSCs II-58

4. GLOBAL MARKET PERSPECTIVE II-59 Table 1: World Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-59

Table 2: World 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets for Years 2020 & 2027 II-60

Table 3: World Current & Future Analysis for Vascular Cells by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-61

Table 4: World 7-Year Perspective for Vascular Cells by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-62

Table 5: World Current & Future Analysis for Cardiac Cells by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-63

Table 6: World 7-Year Perspective for Cardiac Cells by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-64

Table 7: World Current & Future Analysis for Neuronal Cells by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-65

Table 8: World 7-Year Perspective for Neuronal Cells by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-66

Table 9: World Current & Future Analysis for Liver Cells by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-67

Table 10: World 7-Year Perspective for Liver Cells by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-68

Table 11: World Current & Future Analysis for Immune Cells by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-69

Table 12: World 7-Year Perspective for Immune Cells by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-70

Table 13: World Current & Future Analysis for Other Cell Types by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-71

Table 14: World 7-Year Perspective for Other Cell Types by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-72

Table 15: World Current & Future Analysis for Cellular Reprogramming by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-73

Table 16: World 7-Year Perspective for Cellular Reprogramming by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-74

Table 17: World Current & Future Analysis for Cell Culture by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-75

Table 18: World 7-Year Perspective for Cell Culture by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-76

Table 19: World Current & Future Analysis for Cell Differentiation by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-77

Table 20: World 7-Year Perspective for Cell Differentiation by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-78

Table 21: World Current & Future Analysis for Cell Analysis by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-79

Table 22: World 7-Year Perspective for Cell Analysis by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-80

Table 23: World Current & Future Analysis for Cellular Engineering by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-81

Table 24: World 7-Year Perspective for Cellular Engineering by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-82

Table 25: World Current & Future Analysis for Other Research Methods by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-83

Table 26: World 7-Year Perspective for Other Research Methods by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-84

Table 27: World Current & Future Analysis for Drug Development & Toxicology Testing by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-85

Table 28: World 7-Year Perspective for Drug Development & Toxicology Testing by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-86

Table 29: World Current & Future Analysis for Academic Research by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-87

Table 30: World 7-Year Perspective for Academic Research by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-88

Table 31: World Current & Future Analysis for Regenerative Medicine by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-89

Table 32: World 7-Year Perspective for Regenerative Medicine by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-90

Table 33: World Current & Future Analysis for Other Applications by Geographic Region - USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 II-91

Table 34: World 7-Year Perspective for Other Applications by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for USA, Canada, Japan, China, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of World for Years 2020 & 2027 II-92

III. MARKET ANALYSIS III-1

GEOGRAPHIC MARKET ANALYSIS III-1

UNITED STATES III-1 Table 35: USA Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-1

Table 36: USA 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-2

Table 37: USA Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-3

Table 38: USA 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-4

Table 39: USA Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-5

Table 40: USA 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-6

CANADA III-7 Table 41: Canada Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-7

Table 42: Canada 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-8

Table 43: Canada Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-9

Table 44: Canada 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-10

Table 45: Canada Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-11

Table 46: Canada 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-12

JAPAN III-13 Table 47: Japan Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-13

Table 48: Japan 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-14

Table 49: Japan Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-15

Table 50: Japan 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-16

Table 51: Japan Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-17

Table 52: Japan 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-18

CHINA III-19 Table 53: China Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-19

Table 54: China 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-20

Table 55: China Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-21

Table 56: China 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-22

Table 57: China Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-23

Table 58: China 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-24

EUROPE III-25 Table 59: Europe Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Geographic Region - France, Germany, Italy, UK and Rest of Europe Markets - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for Years 2020 through 2027 III-25

Table 60: Europe 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Geographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for France, Germany, Italy, UK and Rest of Europe Markets for Years 2020 & 2027 III-26

Table 61: Europe Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-27

Table 62: Europe 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-28

Table 63: Europe Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-29

Table 64: Europe 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-30

Table 65: Europe Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-31

Table 66: Europe 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-32

FRANCE III-33 Table 67: France Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-33

Table 68: France 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-34

Table 69: France Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-35

Table 70: France 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-36

Table 71: France Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-37

Table 72: France 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Application - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Drug Development & Toxicology Testing, Academic Research, Regenerative Medicine and Other Applications for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-38

GERMANY III-39 Table 73: Germany Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-39

Table 74: Germany 7-Year Perspective for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Cell Type - Percentage Breakdown of Value Sales for Vascular Cells, Cardiac Cells, Neuronal Cells, Liver Cells, Immune Cells and Other Cell Types for the Years 2020 & 2027 III-40

Table 75: Germany Current & Future Analysis for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) by Research Method - Cellular Reprogramming, Cell Culture, Cell Differentiation, Cell Analysis, Cellular Engineering and Other Research Methods - Independent Analysis of Annual Sales in US$ Thousand for the Years 2020 through 2027 III-41

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Growing Value of Stem Cells in Medicine to Create a US$2,4 Billion Opportunity for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell ((iPSC) - GlobeNewswire

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Celularity Announces Dosing of First Patient in Phase I Study of Human Placental Hematopoietic Stem Cell-Derived Natural Killer Cells (CYNK-001) in…

DetailsCategory: DNA RNA and CellsPublished on Wednesday, 25 November 2020 12:03Hits: 443

FLORHAM PARK, NJ, USA I November 24, 2020 I Celularity, Inc., a clinical-stage cell therapeutics company focused on the development of innovative allogeneic placenta-derived cellular therapies, announced today that the first patient was dosed in its Phase 1 clinical study of human placental hematopoietic stem cell-derived natural killer cells (CYNK-001) in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

"Celularity is committed to the development of innovative therapeutic tools to treat serious diseases, particularly targeting diseases with unmet medical needs that have a devastating impact on patients and families.As testimony to this commitment, we are extremely excited to announce the dosing of our first patient in our first clinical trial for, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Through the study team's diligent efforts, we were able to rapidly complete the start-up activities and to accelerate the commencement of patient screening, enrollment, and first dosing in this important study," said Robert J. Hariri, M.D., Ph.D., Celularity's Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer.

This study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:NCT04489420) will determine the maximum safe dose (MSD) of CYNK-001 which are culture-expanded NK cells derived from human placental CD34+ cells. The intravenous (IV) cohort will receive repeat administration of CYNK-001 cells after lymphodepleting chemotherapy. The intratumoral (IT) cohort will not receive lymphodepletion. The safety of this treatment will be evaluated, as researchers investigate the role of NK cells in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma.

"Glioblastoma patients have poor survival and novel treatments are urgently needed for this patient population," said Nazanin Majd, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of Neuro-Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and principal investigator of the study. "Placental-derived NK cells are a promising approach in treatment of GBM patients as these cells have been shown to kill GBM tumor cells in pre-clinical animal studies. This trial offers an innovative immunotherapy approach where exogenously manufactured NK cells will be administered to GBM patients with the goal of shrinking the tumor and improving outcomes."

In a related development, the Company also announced that its abstract highlighting the details of this Phase 1 study was accepted for a poster presentation at the 25thAnnual Meeting and Education Day of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) which will occur November 19-21, 2020.

About CYNK-001CYNK-001 is an investigational cryopreserved allogeneic, off-the-shelf NK cell therapy developed from placental hematopoietic stem cells. CYNK-001 is being investigated as a potential treatment option in adults with COVID-19, as well as for various hematologic cancers and solid tumors. NK cells are a unique class of immune cells, innately capable of targeting cancer cells and interacting with adaptive immunity. CYNK-001 cells derived from the placenta are currently being investigated as a treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), multiple myeloma (MM), and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

About CelularityCelularity, headquartered in Florham Park, N.J., is a next-generation Biotechnology company leading the next evolution in cellular medicine by developing off-the-shelf allogeneic cellular therapies. Celularity's innovative approach to cell therapy harnesses the unique therapeutic potential locked within the cells of the postpartum placenta. Through nature's immunotherapy engine the placenta Celularity is leading the next evolution of cellular medicine with placenta-derived T cells, NK cells, and pluripotent stem cells to target unmet and underserved clinical needs in cancer, infectious and degenerative diseases. To learn more visit celularity.com.

SOURCE: Celularity

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Celularity Announces Dosing of First Patient in Phase I Study of Human Placental Hematopoietic Stem Cell-Derived Natural Killer Cells (CYNK-001) in...

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